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Full text of "Flight and preflight curricula"

LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



629.13 
It6a 

no.ll-2U 




The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books 
are reasons for disciplinary action and may 
result in dismissal from the University. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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ERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 
TlO.2/ 



Flight and Preflight Curricula 




AERONAUTICS BULLETIN NO. 



21 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF AVIATION 

Leslie A. Bryan, Ph.D., LL.B., Director Gertrude A. Becker, Editor 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

Volume 56, Number 15, October, 1958. Published 
seven times each month by the University of Illinois. 
Entered as second-class matter December 11, 1912, at 
the post office at Urbana, Illinois, under the Act of 
August 24, 1912. Office of Publication, 2 Administration 
Building (East), Urbana, Illinois. 

The Library of Congress catalog entry for litis publication 
appears at the end of the text. 



C 2.9, /3 



Flight and Preflight Curricula 



By 

LESLIE A. BRYAN 

Director, Institute of Aviation 
University of Illinois 



Foreword 



The University of Illinois has actively been interested in aviation for 
a period of time dating at least from World War I. During World 
War II that interest increased and in 1945 culminated in the establish- 
ment of the Institute of Aviation. Among its various activities, the In- 
stitute conducts aeronautical research and flight and subprofessional 
technical training for students of the University. 

The Link Foundation, recognizing the pioneering experience of the 
Institute of Aviation, provided a grant to the University of Illinois 
Foundation for use by the Institute in preparing and publishing informa- 
tion about its program, believing that the compilation of this information 
would be valuable to other institutions and to other segments of the 
aviation industry that were considering the establishment of similar 
activities. Five bulletins were issued in the series. Because of the popu- 
larity of two of them, those on the ground-school and flight operations, 
the supply was soon exhausted. 

The Link Foundation has again provided funds for the publication of 
this bulletin, which combines and brings down to date the information of 
the two former bulletins. This bulletin attempts to give the basic infor- 
mation necessary to organize and operate the ground and flight activities 
necessary for a well-rounded and academically-sound program of instruc- 
tion for both the amateur and the professional pilot. While the aim has 
been to provide general information, frequent reference is made to the 
program of the University of Illinois for illustrative purposes. 

In the preparation of the material, Mr. Glen L. Amundson, formerly 
of the Institute staff, and Mr. Eugene L. Haak, ground-school supervisor, 
and Mr. Jesse W. Stonecipher, chief flight instructor, presently of the 
Institute staff, have been most helpful. 

On January 1, 1959, the Civil Aeronautics Administration will be 
absorbed into the Federal Aviation Agency. C.A.A. references will then 
probably become F.A.A. references, C.A.A. manuals probably will be 
F.A.A. manuals, etc. Those changes will not materially affect the con- 
tents of this bulletin. 

In this monograph, as in all publications of the Institute, the author 
has had complete freedom to express his opinions, with the understanding 
that he will assume sole responsibility therefor. 

July 1958 LESLIE A. BRYAN, Director 



Table of Contents 

PART I GROUND-SCHOOL INSTRUCTION 5 

AIRMAN AGENCY CERTIFICATES 5 

UNIVERSITY CREDIT 6 

CLASS SCHEDULE COORDINATION 6 

INSTRUCTOR QUALIFICATIONS 7 

CLASSROOM FACILITIES 7 

SUMMARY OF AVIATION COURSES 10 

PART II IN-FLIGHT INSTRUCTION 10 

ORGANIZATION 10 

OPERATIONS OFFICE 10 

Supplies and equipment 11 

Office space 12 

Ramp or line area 12 

Delegation of responsibility 12 

CHIEF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR 13 

FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS 13 

FLIGHT ASSISTANTS 13 

CHARTER PILOTS 14 

CHIEF LINEMAN 15 

LINEMEN 15 

OPERATIONS CLERKS 15 

FLIGHT PLANNING ROOM 16 

FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS' OFFICE 16 

Office space 16 

Supplies and equipment 16 

AIRCRAFT REQUIREMENTS 17 

AIRPORT REQUIREMENTS 18 

HANGAR FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS 18 

PARACHUTE REQUIREMENTS 18 

MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL 19 

FLIGHT PERSONNEL 19 

FLIGHT CURRICULUM 19 

SUGGESTED FLIGHT-TRAINING TIME TABLE 20 

STUDENT RECORDS 22 



APPENDIXES 23 



A — FLIGHT RECORD 24 

B — CUMULATIVE STUDENT FLIGHT RECORD 30 

C_ AVIATION 101 FLIGHT SYLLABUS (WITH LINK TRAINER) 31 

D — AVIATION 101 FLIGHT SYLLABUS (WITHOUT LINK 

TRAINER) 38 

E _ AVIATION 102 FLIGHT SYLLABUS 41 

F _ AVIATION 103 FLIGHT SYLLABUS 45 

G — AVIATION 104 FLIGHT SYLLABUS 49 

H — AVIATION 205 FLIGHT SYLLABUS 53 

I — AVIATION 206 FLIGHT SYLLABUS 56 

J _ AVIATION 207 FLIGHT SYLLABUS 59 

K — AVIATION 101 GROUND SYLLABUS 61 

L — AVIATION 102 GROUND SYLLABUS 64 

M — AVIATION 103 GROUND SYLLABUS 66 

N — AVIATION 104 GROUND SYLLABUS 67 

O — AVIATION 205 GROUND SYLLABUS 68 

P _ AVIATION 206 GROUND SYLLABUS 69 

Q _ AVIATION 207 GROUND SYLLABUS 70 



REFERENCES 71 



Flight and Pref light Curricula 



For convenience, an instruction program for pilots can be divided into 
two parts — the ground or preflight instruction and the in-flight instruc- 
tion. It is best to give the instruction on a coordinated basis. One way 
to do this is to have a three-hour ground instruction session one night a 
week. Another way is to have one-hour ground sessions on alternate 
days with the flight instruction. Part I will discuss the ground instruction 
and Part II will cover the flight instruction. The emphasis is, in each 
case, on college- or university-type programs. 

Part I — Ground-School Instruction 

Ground or preflight instruction is an integral part of any aviation 
flight program. The Civil Aeronautics Administration (C.A.A.) requires 
applicants for Private Pilot and Commercial Pilot certificates to pass 
written "aeronautical knowledge" examinations. Such instruction can 
be taught more economically and more efficiently in the classroom than 
in individual student-instructor conferences. The subject matter is com- 
prehensive enough so that the content of the course can be taught at 
the college level. This is true of the ground-school materials for both 
the Private Pilot and Commercial Pilot certificates as well as for the other 
certificates and ratings. 

AIRMAN AGENCY CERTIFICATES 

The C.A.A. issues the Airman Agency Certificates for Basic (Private 
Pilot) Ground Schools and Advanced (Commercial Pilot) Ground 
Schools as provided for in Part 50 of the Civil Air Regulations. Airman 
Agency Certificates are also required when an Instrument Flight School 
or a Flight Instructor School is established. Civil Aeronautics Manual 50 
(C.A.M. 50), available from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. 
Government Printing Office, contains material which interprets and ex- 
plains the requirements that are specified in Part 50 of the Civil Air 
Regulations. Both Civil Air Regulations and the Civil Aeronautics 



Manuals are constantly being revised to meet the needs of changing 
conditions. It is therefore important that anyone setting up an aviation 
curriculum, which is subject to approval by the C.A.A., be cognizant of 
the current regulations and interpretations. The status of Civil Air 
Regulations and Manuals can always be ascertained by requesting this 
information from the C.A.A., Washington 25, D. C. 

UNIVERSITY CREDIT 

At the University of Illinois, students receive their credits and grades 
because of their work in ground school. A student's flying is con- 
sidered in much the same light as laboratory work in a science course. 
The reward for the student's successful passing of his flight test is his 
C.A.A. certificate. His reward for successful ground-school work is his 
course credit and his grade. Such a system tends to maintain scholastic 
standards and enables the ground instructor to cover adequately more 
material than is required by the C.A.A. No one, however, is permitted 
to take ground school for credit without flight, or vice versa. In the very 
rare case in which the flight instructor recommends that a student not 
continue with his flying, the student is allowed to continue in the 
ground school and receives full credit if he passes the course. 

CLASS SCHEDULE COORDINATION 

The ground school coordinates its activities with the other units 
within the University by scheduling its classes to make for a minimum 
loss of time in taking the flight instruction. Ground school is taught on 
the campus on the same time-table arrangement as the other University 
course offerings. The student ordinarily takes ground-school instruction 
on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday sequence for a 50-minute period, and 
his flight training on a Tuesday-Thursday-Saturday sequence. Since the 
airport is about six miles from the University, the students are trans- 
ported there by University bus. The bus leaves for the airport 10 min- 
utes after campus classes are over and returns from the airport in time to 
allow a student to attend classes which begin one hour and 50 minutes 
after he left the campus. This time allowance gives the student adequate 
time for transportation, for a 15-minute period before and after his 
flight training for a discussion with his flight instructor, and for an hour 
of flight instruction. Since ground school is group instruction and flight 
training is individual instruction, the best utilization of student and 
instructor time is by an arrangement such as the above, rather than by an 
attempt to give ground school at the airport followed immediately by 
flight instruction. When possible, ground-school subjects are introduced 
at a time which will coincide with the student's flight training. Civil Air 
Regulations (C.A.R.), for example, is taught early in Aviation 101 



because every student must pass a prescribed examination in C.A.R. 
before his first solo flight. 

The ground-school curriculum complements the flight curriculum. 
The major problems occur in coordinating the subject matter in ground 
school with the activities in flight training. Since flight operations slow 
down or speed up with the weather, students may finish their flight work 
before they finish the ground-school course. Flight instructors also at- 
tempt to complete their students' flight training before final examination 
week. Usually the C.A.A. wishes to have the written "aeronautical 
knowledge" examination concluded before the flight test is given. How- 
ever, if the ground-school instruction is as intensive as a university would 
normally give, the C.A.A. may be willing to allow the flight examination 
to be given prior to the final examination in ground school, which norm- 
ally is scheduled with the rest of the university examinations. It is neces- 
sary to coordinate this matter with the C.A.A. unless, as at the University 
of Illinois, the C.A.A. has accredited the university to formulate and to 
give its own examinations and then to certify to the C.A.A. those students 
who have successfully completed the course. 

INSTRUCTOR QUALIFICATIONS 

At the University of Illinois, a ground-school instructor must possess 
at least a bachelor's degree and have the personal and professional quali- 
fications which meet the approval of the Board of Trustees. It is desir- 
able that ground-school instructors hold a Commercial Pilot certificate. 
C.A.M. 50 requires ground-school instructors to hold a Ground Instructor 
certificate with ratings appropriate to the subjects to be taught, or else 
to work directly under a principal instructor holding the certificate and 
the necessary ratings. The current ground-school instructor ratings are 
navigation, aircraft, meteorology, aircraft engines, Civil Air Regulations, 
radio navigation, and Link trainer operator. Persons seeking the C.A.A. 
Ground Instructor certificate must take the subject examinations by 
making arrangements with the nearest C.A.A. safety agent. One ground- 
school staff member can teach 15 scheduled classroom-hours per week 
during the regular semester and 18 classroom-hours per week during the 
summer. This is, however, above the 12-hour teaching load suggested by 
experience as being desirable. 

Salaries for ground instructors range from $600 monthly upwards. 

CLASSROOM FACILITIES 

C.A.M. 50 clearly defines the minimum classroom facilities required 
for all C.A.A. approved ground schools. These requirements are easily 
met by educational institutions, since nothing unusual is required in the 
way of desks, blackboards, illumination, etc. Classroom equipment neces- 



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38 hours + 13 hours flight 
discussion 

DAY 1 Dual 18 Solo 10 
| Observer 6 Link 11 


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CROSS- 1 Day Dual 8 Solo 20 
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48 hours 

1. Civil Air Regulations 

2. Aerial Navigation 

3. Radio 

4. Meteorology 

5. General Service of Aircraft 


48 hours 

1 . Aircraft Engines 

2. Meteorology 


48 hours 

1 . Aerial Navigation 

2. Radio Communications 

3. Cross-Country Flight 


48 hours 

1. Civil Air Regulations 

2. Aircraft 

3. Review for C.A.A. Commercial 
Pilot's Written Examination 


48 hours 

1 . Techniques of Flight 
Instruction 

2. Theory of Flight 


48 hours 

1 . Theory of Instrument Flight 

2. Civil Air Regulations 

3. Meteorology 

4. Navigation 


48 hours 

1. Instrument Flight Publications 
and References 

2. C.A.A. Air Traffic Control 
System 

3. Meteorology 

4. Preparation for C.A.A. 
Instrument Written 
Examination 


Avi. 101 Private Pilot 
Prepares student for 
C.A.A. Private Pilot certificate. 


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Avi. 103 Intermediate 
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Avi. 104 Advanced 

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certificate. 

Credit 3 hours. Fee $300 


Avi. 205 Flight Instructor 

Prepares commercial pilot for 

C.A.A. Flight Instructor 

certificate. 

Credit 3 hours. Fee $300 


Avi. 206 Basic Instrument Flight 
Techniques 

First course in preparing the 
commercial pilot for C.A.A. 
instrument rating 
Credit 3 hours. Fee $300 


Avi. 207 Advanced Instrument 
Flight Procedures 

Second and final course leading 
to C.A.A. instrument rating 
Credit 3 hours. Fee $300 



! ; 



sary for the Basic Ground School requirement includes only the texts and 
the related source materials which cover the subjects listed in C.A.M. 50. 
However, it is desirable to have available as much as possible of the 
Advanced Ground School equipment, which is listed also in C.A.M. 50, 
even though only a Basic Ground School is in operation. Colleges and 
universities which have flight programs and which own their own aircraft, 
or have aeronautical engineering courses, easily meet the equipment 
requirements of C.A.M. 50, since they already have many of the required 
aircraft components prepared for student research and operation. Extra 
equipment, which is not required but which may be used to good advan- 
tage, includes the following: a classroom model of the E-6B computer, 




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Aviation 102 students investigate meteorology problems. 



obtainable from Weems Navigation Service, Annapolis, Maryland; a 
model wind tunnel from Aero Publishers, Incorporated, Los Angeles, 
California; a set of Linguaphone records for teaching Morse code; a 
Link Aviation, Inc., type radio range simulator; and charts from various 
instrument manufacturers showing cutaway views of their products. Such 
extra equipment can be obtained at an estimated total cost of $125. 

It is both economical and acceptable to hold the private pilot and 
the commercial pilot ground-school instruction in the same classroom. 



This room should be equipped with dark shades and with a screen so that 
movies and slides may be presented. Space should also be available for 
other teaching aids such as mock-ups and charts. 

SUMMARY OF AVIATION COURSES 

The chart on page 8 is a summary of the aviation courses involving 
flight training which are currently being given by the University of 
Illinois. The appendix gives a more comprehensive summary of the 
content of the ground-training courses. 

Part II — In-Flight Instruction 

ORGANIZATION 

The flight operations department of the Institute of Aviation, under 
the direct supervision of the chief flight instructor, is responsible for all 
activities directly associated with flight instruction. As indicated on the 
organization chart, these activities are broadly divided into two cate- 
gories: (1) operations and (2) flight training. Operations is a service 
unit ; flight training is a teaching unit. The following chart shows the line 
organization and staff within each unit. 



FLIGHT OPERATIONS 

Chief Flight Instructor and 
Co-assistant Airport Manager (1) 



Operations Office 



Flight Instructors 1 Office 



Chief Lineman (1) 



Operations Clerks (3) 



Charter Pilots (4) 



Flight Instructors (5) 



Lineman (5) 



Temporary 
Flight Assistants (5-12) 



OPERATIONS OFFICE 

The operations office handles (1) line service to itinerant and sched- 
uled aircraft, (2) the sale of gasoline, oil, and other products, (3) hangar 
space on a rental basis, (4) aircraft rental to students and staff members, 
(5) (barter air service for the University faculty and staff, (6) aerial 
photography, and (7) other miscellaneous activities. 

At the University of Illinois Airport, the operations office is under the 
supervision of the chief flight instructor, who also acts as the co-assistant 



10 




Operations Office, showing the flight planning room in the background. 

airport manager. It employs three operations clerks, five linemen, and 
four instructors whose primary duties are charter flying. The office is 
kept open 24 hours every day in the year by having the clerks on an 
alternating shift for week ends and the linemen on rotating shifts covering 
a 24-hour period. It also serves as the coordinating agency with other 
units of the University in matters involving flight. 

Very close coordination between the flight-operations staff and the 
field-maintenance and aircraft-maintenance groups is necessary. The 
operations office becomes a reporting agency on such things as runway 
defects, malfunctioning of field lighting, and needed aircraft repairs. 

Supplies and equipment — In an operation such as that at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois Airport, the following supplies and equipment should 
be available for use by the office personnel: 

3 filing cases 

2 or 3 desks and chairs 

1 sales-ticket machine 

1 adding machine 

1 cash drawer or register 

2 typewriters 



n 



These involve an investment of $1,800 upwards. It is well to remember 
that equipment and supplies can be built up over a period of time, thus 
decreasing the amount of the original investment necessary to start 
operations. 

The following additional equipment is desirable: 

1 Unicom station, if there is no C.A.A. tower on the field 

1 radio receiver tunable between 200-400 kc. for weather reports 

1 wind-dial (wind direction and velocity indicator) 

1 wall map composed of aeronautical sectional charts 

1 mobile gas truck 

1 combination crash truck and fire truck 

12 miscellaneous tools (screw drivers, pliers, etc.) for linemen's use 
12 flashlights (if 24-hour service is available) 
6 checkered flags for vehicles used on the aeronautical-use areas 

2 loading ramps for large aircraft 
1 tug for large aircraft 

1 auxiliary power unit for aid in starting aircraft 

1 portable engine preheater, if required by climatic conditions 

1 showcase for display of materials for resale to itinerants (maps, log- 
books, goggles, etc.) 
The estimated cost of the above is $8,000 upwards. 

Office space — An operations office should be large enough to accom- 
modate at least two desks, filing cabinets, and other miscellaneous office 
equipment. It is desirable to have a waiting room, or transient-pilot 
lounge, of reasonable size to accommodate a wall map and a rack for an 
Airman's Guide, an Airport Directory, a Transient Register, a Flight 
Information Manual, Jeppesen Manuals, weather information board, etc. 
The minimum space recommended for an operations office of this type 
is 30 feet by 20 feet. 

It is also desirable to provide office and desk space for the linemen. 
This space should be convenient to the ramp area and should be large 
enough to accommodate the linemen and the small equipment necessary 
to line service (not including loading ramps, gas trucks, etc.). The 
minimum space recommended is approximately 15 feet by 10 feet. 

Ramp or line area — An adequate ramp or tie-down area will vary 
considerably, depending upon the number of airplanes using the field. 
Some form of permanent tie-downs must be provided in this parking 
area. A regular check of these areas should be included in the lineman's 
activities. 

Delegation of responsibility — In view of the many and varied services 
p< rformed by operations office personnel, it is imperative that the duties 



\7 



and areas of responsibility be specifically set forth. The only completely 
satisfactory solution is to provide written instructions for all personnel. 

CHIEF FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR 

Under the Director of the Institute of Aviation, the chief flight in- 
structor is responsible for (1) planning, organizing, and administering 
all flight-training courses, (2) supervising all nontraining flight activities, 
(3) providing service, assistance, and advice, through the operations 
office, to transient and field-based pilots, and (4) assisting in the routine 
management of the airport. 

A baccalaureate degree, or higher, from a recognized college or uni- 
versity, preferably in education or commerce, is desirable. The C.A.A. 
Commercial Pilot and Flight Instructor certificates and instrument 
rating are mandatory. It is also desirable that the chief flight instructor 
have the following other qualifications: extensive experience in flight 
instruction; extensive practical experience in aerial navigation and 
meteorology, including elementary forecasting; elementary knowledge of 
radio and experience with various aircraft radios; thorough knowledge 
of the Civil Air Regulations; some supervisory experience; ability to deal 
harmoniously with faculty, students, and the general public; mature 
judgment; knowledge of efficient office procedures; tact; dependability; 
and a pleasing personality. 

Salaries for a chief flight instructor range from $600 monthly upwards, 
depending upon the experience desired and the size of the operation. 

FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS 

Under the direction of the chief flight instructor, the flight instructors 
give that part of the courses involving flight and are responsible for such 
other duties as may be assigned. 

A flight instructor should possess a baccalaureate degree from a recog- 
nized college or university, as well as the C.A.A. Commercial Pilot and 
Flight Instructor certificates, an instrument rating, and experience in 
flight instruction. The following other qualifications are also desirable: 
C.A.A. Ground Instructor certificate; ability to deal harmoniously with 
faculty, students, and the general public; good judgment; a pleasing 
personality; and a good personal appearance. 

Salaries for flight instructors range from $500 monthly upwards. 

FLIGHT ASSISTANTS 

Under the direction of the chief flight instructor, the flight assistants 
give flight instruction. 

Flight assistants should possess the same qualifications as flight in- 
structors with respect to C.A.A. certificates and ratings; however, they 
do not necessarily have to meet the degree requirement. 



13 



Many of the flight assistants are employed on a part-time basis and 
salaries are adjusted accordingly. The monthly salary for a full-time 
flight assistant ranges from $375 upwards. 

CHARTER PILOTS 

Under the chief flight instructor, the charter pilots ( 1 ) act as pilots 
for the charter aircraft, ( 2 ) promote the utility aspect of aviation, ( 3 ) oc- 
casionally instruct students, and (4) perform flight duties incidental to 
research problems in aviation. 

Qualifications for the charter pilot should include the following: a 
baccalaureate degree from a recognized college or university; C.A.A. 
Commercial Pilot and Flight Instructor certificates and instrument rating; 
extensive experience in all phases of cross-country flying; extensive knowl- 




An Aviation 101 student simulating flight in a School Link. 

edge of aerial navigation, elementary weather forecasting, radio pro- 
(< (lines, and both instrument and visual flight rules; some knowledge of 
and appreciation for acceptable research techniques; mature judgment; 
pleasing personality; ability to handle delicate flight situations with tact; 
and a good personal appearance. 

The salary range for charter pilots starts at $600 monthly. 



\A 



CHIEF LINEMAN 

Under the general supervision of the chief flight instructor, the chief 
lineman supervises and is responsible for the performance of duties inci- 
dental to the moving, parking, and servicing of aircraft, including wash- 
ing and minor mechanical maintenance work. He supervises and trains 
linemen and assists in the preparation of their schedules. He acts for the 
chief flight instructor in his absence in matters relating to line operations 
and assists the linemen in the performance of such duties as the follow- 
ing: moving aircraft in and out of hangars; directing incoming aircraft 
to service pits; fueling gas tanks; cleaning windshields; recording and 
collecting for gas and oil sales; guiding transient aircraft to tie-downs; 
doing routine work on aircraft flight lines; guarding and protecting air- 
port buildings and aircraft; and aiding transient flyers. He also performs 
any related duties which may be assigned to him. 

The chief lineman should be a high-school graduate and have super- 
visory ability and experience. Preferably, he should have two years of 
experience as a lineman. 

Starting salaries for chief linemen are about $350 monthly. 

LINEMEN 

Under the direct supervision of the chief lineman, the linemen per- 
form the duties incidental to the moving, parking, and servicing of 
aircraft, including washing and minor mechanical maintenance work. 
They move aircraft in and out of hangars, direct incoming aircraft to 
service pits, fuel gas tanks, clean windshields, record and collect for gas 
and oil sales, direct transient aircraft to tie-downs, do routine work as 
assigned on aircraft flight lines, guard and protect airport buildings and 
aircraft, aid transient flyers, and perform related duties as assigned. 

The lineman should be a high-school graduate with a pleasing per- 
sonality and a willingness to serve. 

Monthly salaries for linemen range from $300 upwards. 

OPERATIONS CLERKS 

Under the general supervision of the chief flight instructor, the opera- 
tions clerks are responsible for varied and complex clerical work involving 
the exercise of independent judgment. They supervise and direct the 
work of a small or moderate-sized clerical unit, compile data for reports, 
code, classify, file, and direct the filing of all materials in the filing system, 
give out information as approved by the supervisor, answer routine in- 
quiries, assist in the preparation and maintenance of records, including 
tabulations and the posting of data in various record books, control 
admission of visitors, operate office machines as required and instruct 
others in the operation of such machines, prepare materials for mailing, 
handle cash and other valuables, keep expenditures and income accounts 

15 



which may include the auditing, vouchering, and scheduling of invoices, 
payrolls, and expense accounts, and perform related duties as assigned. 

The operations clerk should be a high-school graduate with business 
training and should have clerical and typing ability as well as one year 
of clerical experience. 

Salaries for operations clerks range from $200 upwards. 

FLIGHT PLANNING ROOM 

A flight-planning room is a necessity for the use of transient pilots as 
well as for students. Included in the equipment of this room should be 
a large wall aeronautical chart upon which air distances can be measured 
and from which visual planning for the use of the established runways 
can be made. Desk space should also be provided upon which charts 
can be laid while the pilot is plotting his course and filling out a flight 
plan. A bulletin board is also a practical necessity. Other desirable 
equipment includes telephone connection with the Air Traffic Communi- 
cation stations and the local traffic control tower. It is desirable also to 
have available in the planning room copies of the Airman's Guide, 
weather sequence reports, and an atlas. Size of this room varies with the 
number of people using it. For an hourly load of approximately 20 
persons, a space about 18 feet square is quite satisfactory at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois Airport. Equipment can be simple and need not cost 
more than $50 to $100. 

FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS' OFFICE 

Office space — The flight instructors' office should provide sufficient 
space for desks and lockers for each permanent flight instructor. A ready 
room for instructor-student meetings and conferences should also be 
provided in an area which is convenient to the flight instructors' office. 
The ready room should be large enough to accommodate all flight gear, 
parachutes, handiphones, airplane control records, student flight records, 
bulletin boards, conference tables, airport diagrams, and other items 
necessary and incidental to flight training. If possible, a Link trainer 
room should also be located in close proximity to the flight office. 
Approximately 100 square feet per instructor should be allowed for the 
flight instructors' office and 800 square feet for the ready room, assuming 
that parachutes, logbooks, and sign-out clip boards are kept there and the 
student load is 10 to 15 students an hour. 

Supplies and equipment — the following supplies and equipment 
should be available in the flight instructors' office: 

1 desk and chair for each permanent flight instructor 

1 locker for each permanent flight instructor 

1 intercom system for each flight instructor (handiphone or its 
equivalent) 

16 



1 conference table and 4 chairs 

1 filing cabinet for student logbooks 

2 or 3 filing cabinets for mimeographed material 
1 typewriter 

1 bulletin board 

1 aeronautical wall chart 

1 parachute rack 

2 parachutes of an approved type for each flight instructor 
1 duplicating machine 

The total cost of similar supplies and equipment will run from $1,200 
upwards. Like other supplies and equipment, the above can be acquired 
over a period of time. 

AIRCRAFT REQUIREMENTS 

A complete flight program — private, commercial, flight instructor, 
and instrument — should provide sufficient airplanes to meet the re- 
quirements of C.A.M. 50. Minor changes are made periodically in these 
requirements, so the latest edition should be consulted. C.A.M. 50 lists 
only the minimum requirements in this regard. It is desirable to provide 
as wide a variety of aircraft makes, in the lightplane category, as pos- 




The University of Illinois owns and operates a fleet of 40 aircraft. 



17 



sible. In general, C.A.M. 50 states that an approved school should meet 
the following aircraft requirements : 

Private pilot course: ( 1 ) At least one airplane for every 15 students; (2) the 
airplane must be capable of carrying two persons and two parachutes without ex- 
ceeding the gross weight limitations of the airplane; and (3) the airplane must be 
suitable for performing the maneuvers necessary to accomplish the flight test for a 
private pilot certificate. 

Commercial pilot course : ( 1 ) All airplanes must be in excess of 50 horse- 
power; (2) both tandem and side-by-side seating arrangements must be repre- 
sented; (3) at least one airplane must be equipped with wing flaps, two-way radio, 
controllable propeller, and a manifold pressure gauge; (4) at least one airplane 
must be properly equipped for visual night flying (see CA.R. Part 43) ; and 
(5) although not required for the commercial course, an airplane suitable for simu- 
lated instrument flying should be provided to meet the unrestricted commercial 
pilot requirements. 

Flight instructor course : The airplanes which are used in the commercial 
course are satisfactory for a flight instructor course. 

Instrument course: The airplane must be equipped in accordance with CA.R. 
Part 43 pertaining to Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Such aircraft must be 
equipped with a suitable hood which will completely exclude all outside visual 
reference to the pilot but which will not restrict the vision of the safety pilot or 
instructor. The airplane must be capable of maintaining a climb of 300 f.p.m. at 
2,000 feet above ground elevation and must be capable of performing all maneuvers 
listed in CA.R. Part 20.42. 

New aircraft satisfactory for the elementary courses can be purchased 

for $6,000 upwards. Satisfactory second-hand aircraft can be purchased 

as low as $1,000. 

AIRPORT REQUIREMENTS 

The airport used for flight-training purposes must meet the minimum 
requirements of C.A.M. 50. Briefly, these requirements are: (1) mini- 
mum runway length, 1,500 feet at sea level, and minimum width, 200 
feet; (2) runways located and oriented to permit 95 per cent usage with 
crosswind components of less than 15 m.p.h.; (3) minimum approach 
angles to permit a 20-to-l glide path; (4) runway grades with an unob- 
structed view 5 feet above the runway for a distance of 500 feet plus 
one half of the runway length; and (5) lighting facilities in accordance 
with Appendix D of the CA.R. where night flying is required. 

HANGAR FACILITIES REQUIREMENTS 

Hangar requirements are listed in C.A.M. 50 and, in general, are as 
follows: (1) a hangar of permanent construction and (2) a hangar 
that is adequate to house all flight equipment when not in operation. A 
rough estimate can be made as to the amount of hangar floor space re- 
quired by allowing 500 square feet for each light aircraft. By careful 
hangaring or by the use of nose-cradles, this figure can be cut in half. 

PARACHUTE REQUIREMENTS 

C.A.M. 50 provides that a minimum of two approved types of para- 
chutes should be provided, with at least two parachutes per instructor. 

18 



Such additional parachutes as are necessary to prevent undue delay in 
normal flight-training progress should also be available. Parachutes sell 
from $200 upwards. Repacking, which must be done every 60 days to 
keep the parachutes legally acceptable, costs about $6 for each parachute. 

MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL 

Sufficient C.A.A. certificated personnel must be employed to maintain 
the aircraft used for flight instruction in complete airworthy condition at 
all times. No more than five uncertificated persons may be under the 
supervision of one certificated mechanic at any time. As an average, one 
mechanic with a helper can care adequately for four well-utilized train- 
ing-type light aircraft, although the rule of thumb varies with the degree 
of utilization of the aircraft. 

FLIGHT PERSONNEL 

Flight personnel in the Institute of Aviation, whose duties are flight 
instruction, includes five flight instructors and, depending upon the en- 
rollment, from five to 12 temporary flight assistants. Each person giving 
flight instruction must possess valid Commercial Pilot and Flight In- 
structor certificates and pertinent ratings. A flight instructor employed 
to teach instrument flying must possess a valid instrument rating. These 
are the minimum requirements established by G.A.M. 50. At the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, a flight instructor must also possess at least a bacca- 
laureate degree from a recognized college or university. 

One flight instructor can teach from nine to 18 students on the 
semester plan if flight sections are scheduled on a basis of five and one- 
half days per week. The variation in number of students per instructor 
depends upon whether the students are private or commercial students. 
Instructors are generally assigned an average of 12 or 13 students per 
semester. The C.A.R. provides that instructors should not fly more than 
eight hours in any one day nor more than 36 hours each week. 

FLIGHT CURRICULUM 

A school may elect to follow the curriculum which is outlined in 
C.A.M. 50 or may submit its own detailed curriculum for approval by 
the C.A.A. At the University of Illinois all courses are detailed in syllabus 
form. Each student is given a copy of the syllabus pertinent to the course 
in which he is enrolled. The Institute of Aviation syllabi are not in com- 
plete conformity with C.A.M. 50 but they have been approved by the 
C.A.A. In addition to the syllabus, the manual given to the student 
should include detailed instructions and regulations pertinent to his 
activity at the airport, airport diagrams, traffic rules, practice area dia- 
grams, general cross-country flight information, aircraft operations data, 
etc. Some of the above information as set up in the Institute of Aviation's 
Student Manual is included in the Appendix. 

19 



SUGGESTED FLIGHT-TRAINING TIME TABLE 

The time table or schedule of flight courses at the University of Illinois 
for a representative semester is as follows: 

Courses offered by the Institute of Aviation are open to students and faculty 
in all departments of the University, subject to limitations imposed by the avail- 
ability of flight equipment. Credit for the majority of Institute of Aviation courses 
is general University credit; its use as credit toward graduation is a matter upon 
which each college or school must pass. 

The fee for each Institute of Aviation flight course is $300. Transportation to 
and from the Airport is provided by the Institute. Arrangements for the physical 
examination for students in Avi. 101 are made by the Institute through the 
University Health Service upon final acceptance in the course. Students in Avi. 
104 are required to possess a second-class C.A.A. medical certificate dated within 
the preceding 12 calendar months. 

Students are cautioned that all times at the Airport listed in the following 
schedules refer to airborne time and that a minimum of 30 minutes must be 
allowed for traveling to the Airport prior to each flight and for returning to the 
campus after each flight. The Institute provides regular bus service without charge 
between the Airport and the campus. The bus leaves the campus from the corner 
of Burrill and Green and makes regular stops at Sixth and Gregory, and First and 
Gregory. For convenience in arranging program cards so that travel time to and 
from the Airport will not cause overlapping of classes, the bus schedule is combined 
with the flight section times as follows: The column labeled "Leave Campus" in- 
dicates the time the bus departs for the Airport; the column labeled "Hours" indi- 
cates airborne time from ground to ground; and the column headed "Arrive 
Campus" lists the time students may expect to be back on the campus. 



COURSES 

AVI. 101. private pilot. Prepares the beginning flight student for a Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration Private Pilot certificate. Airplane utility is emphasized. 
Forty-eight classroom hours of preflight (ground-school) work on Civil Air Regu- 
lations, aerial navigation, radio, meteorology, and general service of aircraft; 13 
hours of flight discussion; 11 hours of Link training; and 38 hours of flight training 
in various makes of airplanes. 

CREDIT SECTION HOURS DAYS ROOM INSTRUCTOR 

3 hours Preflight A 8 TTS 1 1 Aero. Lab. B Haak 

Preflight B 2 MWF 1 1 Aero. Lab. B Haak 



Al 



A2 
A3 
A4 
A5 
B6 

B7 

B8 

B9 



HOURS 


DAYS 


LEAVE CAMPUS 


ARRIVE CAMPUS 


8:00-9:00 


MWF 


7:30 a 


m. 


9:45 a.m. Staff 


9:20-10:20 


W 


7:30 




11:00 


10:40-11:40 


MWF 


10:00 




12:45 p.m. 


9:20-10:20 


F 


8:55 




12:45 


12:20-1:20 


MWF 


11:55 




1:55 


4:30 5:30 


M 


4:00 p 


m. 


5:55 


1:40-2:40 


MWF 


1:10 




3:00 


4:30-5:30 


W 


4:00 




5:55 


3:00-4:00 


MWF 


2:20 




4:45 


4:30-5:30 


F 


2:20 




5:55 


8:00-9:00 


TTS 


7:30 a 


m. 


9:45 a.m. 


9:20-10:20 


Tu 


7:30 




11:00 


10:40 11:40 


TTS 


10:00 




12:45 p.m. 


9:20-10:20 


Th 


8:55 




12:45 


12:20-2:40 


TT 


11:55 




3:00 


3:00-5:20 


TT 


2:20 p 


m. 


5:55 



20 



avi. 102. t secondary flight training. A continuation of the training of the private 
pilot. The purpose is to develop further the qualities of a good pilot. Aero- 
batics are emphasized. Additional ground-school training in meteorology and air- 
craft engines is presented. Forty-eight classroom hours of preflight (ground-school) 
work and 44 hours of flight training (16 dual and 28 solo) in two-place side-by- 
side monoplanes and two-place tandem biplanes. Prerequisite: Avi. 101 or 
Private Pilot certificate; consent of Director. 

3 hours Preflight 3 MWF 1 1 Aero. Lab. B Haak 

The same flight sections listed under Avi. 101 are available for Avi. 102 students 
with the exception of Flight A5. 

AVI. 103. + INTERMEDIATE FLIGHT TRAINING. The third phase of flight training in prep- 
aration for a C.A.A. Commercial Pilot certificate. Emphasis is placed on cross- 
country, night, and instrument flying. Forty-eight classroom hours of preflight 
(ground-school) training in radio, aerial navigation, and use of the E-6B com- 
puter, and 44 hours of flight training (17 dual and 27 solo) in two-place side-by- 
side radio-equipped aircraft and two-place tandem monoplanes. This course may 
be taken by private pilots who wish to increase their cross-country and night- 
flying proficiency. Prerequisite: Avi. 101 or Private Pilot certificate. 

3 hours Preflight 10 MWF 11 Aero. Lab. B Haak 

FLIGHT HOURS DAYS LEAVE CAMPUS ARRIVE CAMPUS INSTRUCTOR 

A2 12:20-5:20 M 11:55 a.m. 5:55 p.m. Staff 

B4 12:20-5:20 Tu 11:55 5:55 

A6 12:20-5:20 W 11:55 5:55 

B8 12:20-5:20 Th 11:55 5:55 

A10 12:20-5:20 F 11:55 5:55 

Bll 8:00-12:00 S 7:30 a.m. 12:45 

avi. I04.f advanced flight training. The final phase of flight-training preparation 
for a C.A.A. Commercial Pilot certificate. Emphasis is placed on precision flying. 
Forty-eight classroom hours of preflight (ground-school) work devoted to aircraft 
and a review of Civil Air Regulations, aerial navigation, meteorology, aircraft and 
aircraft engines, and radio aids to navigation in preparation for written and flight 
phases of the C.A.A. examination for a Commercial Pilot certificate, 44 hours of 
flight training (14 dual and 30 solo) in two-place tandem monoplanes, or four- 
place monoplanes. Prerequisite: Avi. 102 and 103; consent of Director. 

3 hours Preflight 10 TTS 11 Aero. Lab. B Haak 

The same flight sections listed under Avi. 101 are available for Avi. 104 students 
with the exception of Flight B7. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

avi. 205. t FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR COURSE. Prepares the commercial pilot for a C.A.A. 
Flight Instructor certificate. Forty-eight classroom hours of preflight (ground- 
school) work on techniques of flight instruction and theory of flight, and a mini- 
mum of 26 hours of flight training (20 dual and 6 solo) in two-place tandem 
aircraft. Prerequisite: Commercial Pilot certificate; junior standing; consent of 
the Director. 

3 hours Preflight 8 MWF Airport Stonecipher 

The same flight sections listed under Avi. 101 are available for Avi. 205 students 
with the exception of Flights Al and A2. 

avi 206.* basic instrument flight techniques. First course in preparing the commer- 
cial pilot for a C.A.A. instrument rating. Forty-eight hours of preflight (ground- 

t Avi. 102 and 103, or 103 and 104, or 104 and 205 may be taken concur- 
rently by special permission. 

* Offered in alternate semesters. The same flight sections listed under Avi. 101 
are available for Avi. 206 and Avi. 207 students with the exception of Flight Al. 

21 



school) training on theory of instrument flight, Civil Air Regulations, basic 
dead-reckoning and radio navigation, and aviation meteorology; 20 to 22 hours of 
simulated instrument flight and 10 to 12 hours of instrument Link training. Pre- 
requisite: Commercial Pilot certificate, or equivalent flight experience; junior 
standing; consent of the Director. 

3 hours Preflight 8 MWF 11 Aero. Lab. B Peterson 

AVI. 207.* ADVANCED INSTRUMENT FLIGHT procedures. Second and final course leading 
to a C.A.A. instrument rating. Forty-eight classroom hours of preflight (ground- 
school) training on instrument flight publications and references, C.A.A. Air Traffic 
Control System, advanced aviation meteorology, and preparation for the C.A.A. 
examination for instrument rating; 20 to 25 hours of simulated instrument flight 
and 10 to 12 hours of instrument Link training. Prerequisite: Avi. 206, or 40 
hours of simulated instrument flight experience; junior standing; consent of the 
Director. 

3 hours Preflight 8 MWF 11 Aero. Lab. B. Peterson 

AVI. 292. SPECIAL RATING (MULTI-ENGINE LAND). Prepares the commercial pilot for a 
C.A.A. multi-engine land airplane rating. Sixteen classroom hours of preflight 
(ground-school) work and 15 hours of flight training in a multi-engine land air- 
plane. Prerequisite: Commercial Pilot certificate; consent of the Director. 

1 hour To be arranged 

BUS SCHEDULE 

The following bus schedule will be in effect on all flying days. The bus leaves 
campus from the corner of Burrill and Green and makes regular stops at Sixth and 
Gregory, and First and Gregory. 

LEAVE CAMPUS — ARRIVE AIRPORT LEAVE AIRPORT — ARRIVE CAMPUS 



7:30 a.m. 


7:45 a.m, 


8:55 


9:10 


10:00 


10:15 


11:00 


11:15 


11:55 


12:10 p.m 


1:10 p.m. 


1:25 


2:20 


2:35 


3:10 


3:25 


4:00 


4:15 


5:00 


5:15 



7:50 a.m. 


8:05 a.m. 


9:30 


9:45 


10:40 


11:00 


11:30 


11:45 


12:30 p.m. 


12:45 p.m 


1:40 


1:55 


2:45 


3:00 


3:40 


3:55 


4:30 


4:45 


5:40 


5:55 



STUDENT RECORDS 

A record of the student's flying time is kept in a flight record book 
which is provided by the University. This record is the property of the 
school until the student completes the course. Upon completion of the 
course the student signs a Cumulative Student Flight Record sheet and is 
given his flight record book. The cumulative record remains on file with 
the University as a permanent record. 

Sample pages from the flight record used at the University of Illinois 
and a copy of the Cumulative Student Flight Record are contained in 
Appendixes A and B. 



* Offered in alternate semesters. The same flight sections listed under Avi. 101 
are available for Avi. 206 and Avi. 207 students with the exception of Flight Al. 



22 



Appendixes 



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rt x) 

s S 

3 
en <d 

u jt 



*d C3 



O ^^ 

t- •. 

bo 2 

3 a 

3 rt 

^ o 

CO c 

^ o 



T3 v ~' O 

43 «u 

bo .. Cu 

S s c 



2 ^ v 

o o ^ 

ti 0) lO 



bo 



*43 3 



26 



4 a --2 



4-> O +J 



< 

H 
W 










W 
H 

W 










o 

H 










9 










u 










u 










PS 
C/3 











O 

o 

C/] 


u 








fcuO 








o 

o 








►J 

< 
Q 


U 

>< 
















o 








Simulated 
Instru- 
ment 








3 








i 4) 








s I 

o 








ME 

EH 


en 

3 

.2 
*> 


.1 

E 
H 


o 
H 



u 



fe 



c 
'-5 
c 



27 



STUDENT PROGRESS CHART 



Flight Number 


2 


5 


9 


14 


16 


17 


18 


19 


21 


23 


24 


27 


29 


39 


"41 


Effect of Controls 
































St & Level 
































Coord Ex 
































Confid Man 
































C & C Turns 
































G & G Turns 
































P O Nml Stall 
































P Off Nml Stall 
































Climbing- Turn Stall 
































Gliding Turn Stall 
































720 Deg Steep Turn 
































Spin 
































Takeoff 
































Traffic Pattern 
































Emerg on T.O. 
































P On Compt Stall 
































P On Partial Stall 
































P Off Compt Stall 
































P Off Partial Stall 
































High Alt Emerg Procedures 
































10S0 Deg Overhead 
































360 Deg Overhead 
































180 Deg Overhead 
































180 Deg Side 
































90 Deg Side 
































Slips 
































Slow Flight 






























Landings 






























Cross Wind T.O. 
































Cross Wind Landing 
































1st Solo 






























2nd Solo 






























Accuracy Landings 






























Wheel Landings 
































Power Approach 
































Pylon Eights 
































Strange Airport 
































Dragging a Field 
































Fit Around Rest. Area 
































Spirals 
































Slips in Turns 
































Slips to a Spot 

































28 



FLIGHT CHECK 



Equipment Exam (Oral). 
Preflight Check 



Taxiing. 



Run-Up Check. 
Take Offs 



Short or Soft Field Take Off. 

Climbs & Climbing Turns 

Maneuvering min. speed 



Stalls: P.Off Part P.Off Nml P.Off Cmpt P O Part. 

P O Nml P O Cmpt CTS GTS XC 



Turns around pylons. 



Airport traffic pattern. 



Accuracy approaches and spot landings- 
Landing technique 



Cross wind T.O. & Landing. 



Cross-Country Flight Planning. 
Cross-Country Flying 



Traffic control procedures- 



Maneuvering with engine out. 
Emergencies 



Smoothness and coordination. 
Judgment 



Student. 



Instructor. 



Type of check 



IMTFC 



Date- 



Check Pilot- 



Final Grade. 



CPMTFC 



IRFC 



CAAFC 



29 



Appendix B 

CUMULATIVE STUDENT FLIGHT RECORD: Semester 



Course 



Name_ 



Ag< 



Sex 



College 



Permanent address. 



Student's statement: I have accepted custody of my Flight Record book for the semester and 
course indicated in the upper right hand corner, and I certify that during the course I 
received flight training as follows: Dual Solo Link 



Certificate Number 



Date 



Signature 



Avi. 101 - 

Instructor 



Semester. 



Dual required to solo 

IMTG CPMTG 

Examiner 



CAR written- 

IRG CAAG_ 



Date PP cert. & ASEL rating rec'd 

Aircraft 

Dual 

Solo 

Total dual Total solo. 



X-C 



Avi. 102 — Semester. 

Instructor . 

Hours to solo 1_ 

Aircraft 

Dual 

Solo 

Total dual 

Avi. 103 — Semester. 

Instructor 

Aircraft 
DualX-C-D 
Solo X-C-D 
Dual Lcl-N 
Solo Lcl-N 
DualX-C-N 



Hours to solo 2. 



Total solo_ 





Totnl solo 




Avi. 104 — Semester 
Instnirtor 








Instructor grade ._ 


_ CAA grade 





DntP CP rprt. rpr'd 


Retakes 



Aircraft 

Dual 

Solo 

Total dual 



Avi. 205 — Semester. 

Instructor . 

Written grades 



Instructor grade 

Inspector 

Date Fl cert. rec'd. 

Retakes (if any) 

Aircraft 

Dual 

Solo 

Total dual. 



CAA grades- 



Total solo. 



Avi. 206 — Semester. 

Instructor 

Written grades 



Instructor grade- 
Inspector 



CAA grades. 



Date instrument rating rec'd. 

Reta kes 

Simulated instrument 

Semester 

Instructor 

Grades . . 



Link. 



Date & rating rec'd 

Aircraft 

Dual 

Solo 

Total dual. 



Total solo. 



Additional information including accidents, 
forced landings, lost, etc. 



Total solo 



This student's total dual is 

This student's total solo is 



30 



Appendix C — Aviation 101 Flight Syllabus (with Link Trainer) 

ORIENTATION PHASE 

Period 1. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Discussion of cockpit checkout in both airplane and School Link, 

forces on the airplane in flight, axis of rotation, function of controls, 

instruments, and trim tab. Discuss the similarity and differences in 

the airplane and the School Link. 

Period 2. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes dual. 

Discuss preflight check, pretakeoff check, attitude references, straight 

and level flight, level turns, and use of section lines for straight flight. 

Period 3. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Review of period 1. Discussion and practice of straight climbs and 

glides to specified altitudes, medium banked level turns of 45°, 90°, 

and 180°, climbing and gliding turns, and taxiing. Explain why the 

airplane turns, the use of the rudder in turns, carburetor heat control, 

relaxation in rough air, and forces on the airplane in turns. 

Period 4. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Discussion and practice of preflight and pretakeoff checks, starting 

procedure, taxiing, use of brakes, straight climbs and climbing turns 

to specified altitudes, return to and maintenance of straight and level 

flight, level turns, glides, and gliding turns. 

Period 5. Twenty minutes discussion and 40 minutes dual. 
Discussion and practice of maneuvers covered in periods 3 and 4. 
Straight and level flight, turns, climbs, glides, and climbing and gliding 
turns to specified altitudes. 

PRESOLO HIGH WORK PHASE 

Period 6. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 
training. 

Review of fundamentals. Discussion and practice of coordination ex- 
ercises in turns, steep turns, normal stalls, power-on stalls, power-off 
stalls, torque correction in relation to airspeed and power changes, 
and takeoffs. Review forces on the airplane, location of center of 
gravity and center of pressure (lift) . 

Period 7. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 
training. 

31 



Review of fundamentals and period 6. Explain why ailerons are not 
used during stalls. Discussion of steep turns, takeoffs, climbing and 
gliding turn stalls, and spins. 

Period 8. One hour School Link training. 

Review all maneuvers covered to date. Discussion and practice of co- 
ordination exercises, steep turns, normal stalls, power-on stalls, power- 
ofT stalls, torque correction in relation to airspeed and power changes, 
takeoffs, climbing and gliding turn stalls, and spins. 

Period 9. Five minutes discussion and 55 minutes dual. 
Practice takeoffs, climbing turns, coordination exercises in climbing 
turns, steep turns, power-on and power-off stalls, climbing and gliding 
turn stalls, and spins. Introduce landings on return to airport. 

PRESOLO LOW WORK PHASE 

Period 10. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Discussion and practice of takeoffs, low-altitude forced landings on 

takeoff, following a ground pattern, traffic patterns, and landings. 

Period 11. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Review period 10. Discussion and practice of drift correction, slips, 

crosswind takeoffs and landings. 

Period 12. One hour School Link training. 

Review all maneuvers in periods 10 and 11. Discussion and practice 
of slow flight holding altitude, partial, normal, and complete stalls, 
and high-altitude forced landings. 

Period 13. One hour School Link training. 

Review all previous maneuvers. Discuss and practice entry to traffic, 
slips, landings, and high-altitude forced landing patterns (90°, 180°, 
360°, and 1080° approaches). 

Period 14. Five minutes discussion and 55 minutes dual. 
Practice maneuvers discussed and practiced in period 13. 

SOLO PHASE 

Period 15. One hour School Link training. 

Review of takeoffs, normal landings, traffic patterns, crosswind take- 
offs and landings. Discussion and practice of recovery from rough 
landings, and discussion of accuracy landings. 



32 



Period 16. Ten minutes discussion and 50 minutes dual. 
Practice takeoffs and landings, crosswind takeoffs and landings, re- 
covery from rough landings, slips, and slips to a landing. 

Period 17. Five minutes discussion and 55 minutes dual. 
Practice takeoffs and landings, emergencies on takeoff, crosswind take- 
offs and landings, slips, and accuracy landings. 

Period 18. Ten minutes discussion, 30 minutes dual, and 20 minutes 
solo. 

Practice takeoffs and landings, slips, and crosswind takeoffs and land- 
ings. Instructor supervises a minimum of three solo takeoffs and 
landings from the point of takeoff. If the student is not ready for solo 
this period is repeated, using the entire period for dual until the stu- 
dent is proficient enough to solo. All such repeated periods will be 
marked in the flight record book as period 18 X; after the first solo 
the student will proceed to period 19. 

Period 19. Ten minutes discussion, 20 minutes dual, and 30 minutes 
solo. 

Discussion and dual will be devoted to a review of takeoffs and land- 
ings, crosswind takeoffs and landings, slips, and accuracy landings. 
Instructor will supervise a minimum of five solo takeoffs and landings 
from the takeoff position. 

SOLO STAGE 

Period 20. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Review of accuracy landings, slips to a spot, crosswind takeoffs and 

landings, coordination exercises, and drift correction. 

Period 21. Thirty minutes dual and 30 minutes solo. 
Practice takeoffs and landings, slips, and slips to a spot. Instructor 
will supervise a minimum of five solo takeoffs and slips to a spot from 
the takeoff position. 

Period 22. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Discussion and practice of power approaches, wheel landings with 

and without power, traffic pattern, and accuracy wheel landings. 

Period 23. Five minutes discussion and 55 minutes dual. 

Practice power-on approaches and power-off approaches followed by 

wheel landings, both power-on and power-off. 



33 



Period 24. Ten minutes discussion and 50 minutes solo. 

Instructor supervises and grades students on solo crosswind takeoffs 

and landings and wheel landings. 

PRIVATE PILOT PROFICIENCY HIGH WORK PHASE 

Period 25. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Review of all stalls, steep turns, spins, climbing turns, and gliding 

turns. 

Period 26. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Review of stalls and steep turns. Discussion and practice of slow 

flight, spirals, and high-altitude forced landings (90°, 180°, 360°, and 

1080° approaches). 

Period 27. Five minutes discussion and 55 minutes dual. 
Review of takeoffs, climbing turns, stalls, spins, steep turns, slow flight, 
high-altitude forced landings with spiral approach, gliding turns, 
traffic, and accuracy landings. 

PRIVATE PILOT PROFICIENCY LOW WORK PHASE 

Period 28. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes School Link 

training. 

Discussion and practice of 8's around pylons, accuracy landings, slips, 

and forced landings from 8's around pylons. 

Period 29. Five minutes discussion and 55 minutes dual. 
Practice on 8's around pylons, forced landings from 8's around pylons, 
low-altitude forced landings, coordination exercises, slips, and ac- 
curacy landings. 

PRIVATE PILOT PROFICIENCY FLIGHT TEST PHASE 

Period 30. One hour School Link training. 

Review of all maneuvers required on private pilot flight test. 

Period 31. One hour dual. 

Mid-term flight test with another staff instructor. Maneuvers as out- 
lined in G.A.A. private pilot flight test. 

CROSS-COUNTRY PHASE 

Period 32. Thirty minutes discussion and 30 minutes dual in Cessna 

140 or other side-by-side aircraft. 

Discussion of preflight check, cockpit check, starting procedure, use 

34 



of toe brakes, three-point attitude of aircraft, flight characteristics of 
the aircraft in relation to climbs, stalls, spins, level flight, turns, land- 
ings, and glides. Practice in cockpit check, taxiing, use of toe brakes, 
takeoffs, climbs, power-off and power-on normal stalls, gliding turns, 
and landings. 

Period 33. One hour discussion and a nine-hour dual cross-country 
flight in four-place aircraft. Three students and instructor. 
Discussion includes map preparation, flight-plan preparation, check- 
ing the weather prior to takeoff, and use of computer, Airman's Guide, 
and Airport Director. 

The nine-hour flight will be divided into three segments or "legs." 
Each student will alternate as pilot-navigator, navigator, and radio 
operator-weather observer for one leg of the flight. Each student 
therefore will log one hour discussion, three hours dual cross-country, 
and six hours flight observer cross-country. 

The following duties are designated for each position: 
Pilot-Navigator: Responsible for preflighting the aircraft, knowing the 
airport runway system and traffic pattern, flying the aircraft and 
watching for other traffic, checking and following the weather con- 
ditions enroute, handling radio procedure with the control tower, 
executing a "lost procedure" properly when specified by the instructor, 
and flying the airplane for a brief period under simulated instrument 
flight conditions. 

During this period the pilot-navigator will be given approximately 
20 minutes "hood" or instrument time in order to demonstrate to his 
own satisfaction what happens when an unqualified pilot attempts to 
fly in instrument weather conditions. 

Navigator: Responsible for setting up and revising the flight plan, 
keeping a current flight log, knowing anticipated wind conditions, 
and furnishing current fixes to the pilot and the radio operator for 
position reports. 

Radio Operator-Weather Observer: Responsible for making radio 
contacts with range stations, obtaining the latest weather reports, route 
forecasts, terminal forecasts, and winds aloft, furnishing this informa- 
tion to the pilot-navigator. The radio operator files a flight plan by 
radio, makes regular position reports, and closes the flight plan with 
the last C.A.A. facility to be contacted prior to landing at the desti- 
nation. 

Period 34. One hour dual. 

Practice of strange airport procedures at Illini Airport with student 



35 



dragging a potential emergency field on return trip. Practice on short 
field takeoff and landing procedures in small designated area of home 
field. 

Period 35. Thirty minutes discussion and one hour dual night flying. 
Discussion of night flying and main points of difference in night take- 
offs and landings, demonstration of use of Aldis lamp. 
Practice taxiing, takeoffs, traffic flying, and landings at night. Stu- 
dent may be soloed for one or two landings at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

Period 36. One hour discussion and a three-hour dual night cross- 
country flight in four-place aircraft. Three students and instructor. 
Discussion of aids to night navigation including airway beacons, radio 
range, main highways and towns, forced landings at night with and 
without flares, and night "lost procedures." Practice in night pilotage, 
radio range flying, light line flying, and strange field traffic patterns 
and night landings. On this flight each student will log one hour dis- 
cussion, one hour dual night cross-country, and two hours flight ob- 
server night cross-country. 

Period 37. Thirty minutes discussion (15 minutes prior to flight 
and 15 minutes immediately after flight) and a three-hour solo cross- 
country flight. 

The student is checked on his map preparation, flight-plan prepara- 
tion, knowledge of airports at which he will land, understanding of 
anticipated weather en route, and his plans in the event he becomes 
lost or is forced down because of weather. 

Period 38. Thirty minutes discussion (15 minutes prior to flight 

and 15 minutes immediately following flight) and a three-hour solo 

cross-country flight. 

The student is checked as in period 37 for a flight over a different 

route. 

FINAL FLIGHT TEST PHASE 

Period 39. One hour dual. 

Review all maneuvers in preparation for C.A.A. private pilot flight 

test. 

Period 40. One hour solo. 

Practice maneuvers as directed by the instructor. 



36 



Period 41. One hour dual. 

Review all maneuvers in preparation for C.A.A. private pilot flight 

test. 

Period 42. One hour solo. 

Practice maneuvers as directed by the instructor. 

Period 43. One hour dual. 

Instructor recommendation flight. Upon completion of flighty in- 
structor completes student file including C.A.A. 342A and graduation 
certificate. 

Period 44. One hour dual. 

C.A.A. private pilot flight test practice. 

Period 45. One hour dual (approximate). 
C.A.A. private pilot flight test. 



37 



Appendix D — - Aviation 101 Flight Syllabus 
(Without Link Trainer) 

PRESOLO PHASE (12 HOURS) 

Period 1. Forty-five minutes dual. Demonstration of visual preflight 
inspection procedure, cockpit procedures, engine starting and stopping 
procedures, taxiing technique, use of brakes, effect and use of con- 
trols, straight and level flight (altitude, directional control), stability in 
flight, effects of torque and torque correction, and determining wind 
direction from the ground. 

Familiarization with the local area, auxiliary fields, restricted areas, 
landmarks, hazards to flight, and determining wind direction in flight. 
Students should be required to follow through on all demonstrated 
maneuvers. Emphasis should be placed on "follow through" technique 
for takeoffs and landings during presolo, periods 1 through 7. 

Period 2. Forty-five minutes dual. Review of all maneuvers and pro- 
cedures in period 1. Demonstration of medium and gentle turns, co- 
ordination exercises, climbs and climbing turns, and levelling off. 
Practice on straight and level flight, medium and gentle turns, coordi- 
nation exercises, and climbs and climbing turns. 

Period 3. Forty-five minutes dual. Review of maneuvers and pro- 
cedures which require emphasis. Demonstration of glides and gliding 
turns and use and effect of trim. Practice on all previously demon- 
strated maneuvers. 

Period 4. Forty-five minutes dual. Review of all maneuvers and pro- 
cedures which require emphasis. Demonstration of characteristic stall 
and power-on and power-off stalls — straight ahead, to the right, and 
to the left. Practice on the power-on and power-off stall series. 

Period 5. Forty-five minutes dual. Review of climbs and climbing 
turns, glides and gliding turns, and power-on and power-off stalls. 
Demonstration of entry into and recovery from spins. Practice on 
entry into and recovery from spins. 

Period 6. Forty-five minutes dual. Review of power-on and power- 
off stalls and entry into and recovery from spins. Demonstration of 
slow flying, steep turns, and forced-landing procedures. Practice on 
entry into and recovery from spins, slow flying, steep turns, and forced 
landings. 

Period 7. One hour dual. Review of all maneuvers and procedures 
which require emphasis. Demonstration of S-turns and rectangular 
courses. Practice on S-turns and rectangular course. 

38 



Period 8. One hour dual. Review of S-turns and rectangular courses 
with emphasis on slow flying. Demonstration of takeofFs and power-off 
landings. Practice on takeoffs and power-off landings (without flaps). 

Period 9. One hour dual. Review of previous lesson on landings and 
takeoffs. Demonstration of power-on landings, crosswind landings, 
slips, recovery from bounce landings, overshooting, undershooting, and 
go-around procedures. Practice on takeoffs and landings under all 
wind conditions with stress on emergency-landing procedure, i.e., over- 
shooting, undershooting, and go-around procedures. 

Period 10. One hour dual; or 30 minutes dual and 30 minutes solo. 
Review of and practice on takeoffs and landings. 

If proficiency permits, the last half of this period may be devoted to 
supervised solo consisting of three solo landings, preferably under ideal 
wind conditions. Prior to the first supervised solo, the student should 
be given a blindfold cockpit check. 

Period 11. One hour dual; or 30 minutes dual and 30 minutes solo. 
Same as period 10. 

Period 12. Thirty minutes dual and 30 minutes solo. Same as period 
10. 

Period 13. Forty-five minutes solo. Solo review of all maneuvers and 
procedures which require emphasis as briefed by the instructor. 

Period 14. Forty-five minutes dual. Check and review. Check to be 
according to objective standards and to be performed by the flight 
instructor. Review as determined by the instructor. 

AFTER SOLO PHASE (23 HOURS) 

Period 15. One hour and 30 minutes dual. Plotting courses, deter- 
mining magnetic courses, computing distance and estimated times of 
arrival, checking weather, studying and checking navigational facili- 
ties and airports, determining fuel requirements, loading of aircraft, 
and selecting altitude. Simple cross-country flight in which it is 
demonstrated and student follows through on determining compass 
course, estimating time between check points, determining course to 
alternate airport. At destination, student secures aircraft and plans the 
return cross-country flight. 

Period 16. One hour and 15 minutes. Forty-five minutes dual: 
review of presolo maneuvers and demonstration and execution of 
precision turns of shallow, medium, and steep banks. Thirty minutes 
solo: practice on precision turns and takeoffs and landings. 



39 



Period 17. Two hours dual. Cross-country flight with stops at two or 
more airports other than the home airport, including radio orientation 
and emergency and critical situations. 

Period 18. One hour and 15 minutes. Forty-five minutes dual: review 
of precision turns and takeofTs and landings. Demonstration of flight 
at various power settings in order to accomplish straight and level 
flight and turns in both directions without loss or gain of altitude, 
climbing and gliding turns at minimum controllable airspeed. Thirty 
minutes solo: practice of demonstrated maneuvers. 

Period 19. One hour solo. Simple solo cross-country flight. 

Period 20. One hour and 30 minutes. Forty-five minutes dual: dem- 
onstration and practice of secondary stalls, stabilizer stalls, excessive 
top-and-bottom rudder stalls, excessive high-speed stalls in turns, cross- 
control stalls, and rudder-exercise stalls; 720° steep turns and simu- 
lated high-altitude forced landings. Forty-five minutes solo. 

Period 21. Forty-five minutes dual. Check and review. Check to be 
according to objective standards and to be performed by the flight 
instructor. Review as necessary. 

Period 22. One hour solo. Solo cross-country flight. 

Period 23. Two hours. Forty-five minutes dual: demonstration and 
practice of 90° power-off and power-on accuracy wheel landings, 
crosswind landings and takeofTs, short or soft-field takeofTs and land- 
ings and precision landings, using slips or flaps, and low-altitude 
simulated forced landings. One hour and 15 minutes solo: practice 
landings as assigned. 

Period 24. Two hours solo. Cross-country flight with graded land- 
ings at two or more stops at airports other than the home airport. 

Period 25. One hour and 45 minutes. Forty-five minutes dual: re- 
view of stalls, precision turns, and 90° approach accuracy landings. 
One hour solo : practice on maneuvers and procedures assigned. 

Period 26. Four hours and 30 minutes solo. Cross-country flight to 
a point more than 200 airline miles from the base of operations with 
at least two full-stop landings during the flight. 

Period 27. One hour solo. Review of all air maneuvers as deemed 
necessary by the flight instructor. 

Period 28. One hour and 30 minutes dual. Final flight check by the 
instructor. One hour flight test by C.A.A. 



40 



Appendix E — Aviation 102 Flight Syllabus 

Secondary flight training consists of a total of 44 hours of flight, 22 
of which are given in two-place side-by-side aircraft and 22 hours in a 
two-place, tandem biplane. The Cessna 140 is used for the first 22 hours 
and the Boeing "Kay-det" for the final 22 hours. The flight time in the 
Cessna is divided into six hours of dual and 16 hours of solo; the time 
in the Boeing consists of 10 hours dual and 12 hours solo. 

STAGE A (CESSNA) 

Period 1. One hour dual. 

Checkout in aircraft type. Checkout of takeoffs, landings, traffic 
pattern, stalls, slow flight, climbs, glides, steep turns, and forced land- 
ings. This flight should be considered a safe-for-solo check. If, in the 
opinion of the instructor, the student is not safe for solo at the com- 
pletion of one hour dual, period 2 will be utilized as another checkout 
flight. 

Period 2. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on the maneuvers presented during the previous flight. 

Period 3. One hour solo. 

Review all primary maneuvers, including S-turns across road, ele- 
mentary 8's, stalls, 720° power turns, and accuracy landings. 

Period 4. One hour dual. 

Review spins, stalls, slow flight, accidental spins; introduce chandelles 

and forced landings. 

Period 5. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on spins, slow flight, chandelles, spirals, and accuracy 
landings. All spins at this stage should be precision spins of either one 
and one-half or two turns. 

Period 6. One hour solo. 

Review maneuvers previously presented, plus slow flight. 

Period 7. One hour dual. 

Review chandelles; introduce lazy 8's, check accuracy approaches in- 
cluding 90°, 180°, and 360° overhead, spiral approaches, and slips. 

Period 8. One hour solo. 

Review chandelles, lazy 8's, slips, elementary 8's, precision spins (two 

turns), and 180° overhead approaches. 



41 



Period 9. One hour solo. 
Review all previous maneuvers. 

Period 10. One hour solo. 
Review all previous maneuvers. 

Period 11. One hour dual. 

Review chandelles and lazy 8's; introduce on-pylon 8's, power ap- 
proaches, and wheel landings. 

Period 12. One hour solo. 

Practice chandelles, lazy 8's, and on-pylon 8's. 

Period 13. One hour solo. 

Practice on-pylon 8's, power approaches, and wheel landings. 

Period 14. One hour solo. 

Review all previous maneuvers. 

Period 15. One hour dual. 

Precision spins, stalls from unusual attitudes, accidental spins, spirals, 

power approaches, wheel landings, chandelles, lazy 8's, and on-pylon 

8's. 

Period 16. One hour solo. 

Review precision spins, stalls from unusual attitudes, accidental spins, 

spirals, wheel landings, and power approaches. 

Period 17. One hour solo. 
Review all previous maneuvers. 

Period 18. One hour solo. 
Review all previous maneuvers. 

Period 19. One hour dual. 

Review all maneuvers presented to date, check student carefully on all 

phases of precision flying, emergency procedures, and crosswind 

technique. 

Period 20. One hour solo. 
Review all maneuvers in this stage. 

Period 21. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on chandelles, lazy 8's, on-pylon 8's, and wheel landings. 

Period 22. One hour solo. 

Review. 



42 



STAGE B (BOEING) 

Period 23. One hour dual. 

Cockpit checkout, starting and stopping engine, straight and level 

flight, medium turns, climbs and glides, takeoffs, and landings. 

Period 24. One hour dual. 

Takeoffs, climbs, climbing turns, stalls, spins, gliding turns, 720° power 

turns, landings, and forced landings. 

Period 25. One hour dual. 

Takeoffs, landings, chandelles, lazy 8's, forced landings, spirals, and 

crosswind landings. 

Period 26. One hour dual. 

Safe-for-solo check. Student should be checked for safety in emer- 
gency procedures, stalls, spins, climbing and gliding flight, takeoffs 
and landings, and crosswind takeoffs and landings. 

Period 27. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on takeoffs, landings, climbs, glides, and 720° power 

turns. 

Period 28. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on stalls, spins, 720° power turns, and accuracy landings. 

Period 29. One hour dual. 

Precision spins, spins from unusual attitudes, stalls from unusual atti- 
tudes, chandelles, lazy 8's, and forced landings; introduce loop and 
snap roll. 

Period 30. One hour solo. 

Review stalls, spins, chandelles, lazy 8's, loops, and snap rolls. 

Period 31. One hour solo. 
Review all previous maneuvers. 

Period 32. One hour dual. 

Review crosswind landings, loops, snap rolls, chandelles, lazy 8's, 
on-pylon 8's, and forced landings; introduce split-S, slow roll, Im- 
melman turn, and give one demonstration of inverted spin. 

Period 33. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on snap roll, split-S, slow roll, and Immelman turn. 

NOTE — Inverted spins are never practiced solo. 

Period 34. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on all previous maneuvers. 

43 



Period 35. One hour dual. 

Review previous aerobatics including chandelles and lazy 8's; intro- 
duce half-roll, cartwheel, and falling leaf, forced landings, and cross- 
wind landings. 

Period 36. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on previous aerobatics including half-roll, cartwheel, 

and falling leaf. 

Period 37. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on all aerobatics presented to date. 

Period 38. One hour dual. 

Review all aerobatics presented to date; introduce Cuban 8. 

Period 39. One hour solo. 
Solo practice on all aerobatics. 

Period 40. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on accuracy landings, on-pylon 8's, power approaches, 

and wheel landings. 

Period 41. One hour dual. 

Review all phases of low work, check precision spins, stalls, on-pylon 
8's, and forced landings. Student should be advised of his short- 
comings, and instructor should make recommendations regarding the 
maneuvers the student should practice on the next two solo flights. 

Period 42. One hour solo. 

Practice as recommended by instructor in preparation for final check. 

Period 43. One hour solo. 

Practice as recommended by instructor in preparation for final check. 

Period 44. One hour dual. 
Final flight check. 



44 



Appendix F — Aviation 103 Flight Syllabus 

Intermediate flight training consists of 44 hours of flight as follows: 
three hours of local night flying in a two-place monoplane, one hour of 
which is dual and two hours of which are solo ; 28 hours of cross-country 
flying in a two-place Cessna, eight hours of which are dual and 20 hours 
of which are solo; one three-hour night dual cross-country flight; five 
hours of simulated instrument flight; and five hours of instrument Link 
training. On all cross-country flights, radio aids to navagation are 
emphasized. 

STAGE A (CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHT) 
Period 1. Two hours dual. 

Out and back flight following a predetermined flight plan and using 
such radio facilities as are available. Checkout in aircraft to be used. 

Period 2. Three hours solo. 

Out and back flight following a predetermined flight plan and keep- 
ing an accurate flight log. Two landings en route. 

Period 3. Three hours dual. 

Radio-controlled flight along civil airways. Student files a flight plan 

by radio and while on airways performs navigation by radio only. 

Period 4. Three hours solo. 

Triangular-course flight following a predetermined flight plan and 

keeping an accurate flight log. Two landings en route. 

Period 5. Three hours solo. 
Radius of action, out and back. 

Period 6. Three hours dual. 

Radius of action to an alternate airport. Student determines time to 
turn to alternate airport, proceeding there, landing, and returning to 
base according to flight plan. 

Period 7. Three hours solo. 

Radius of action to an alternate airport. Follow same procedures 

used in period 6. 

Period 8. Seven hours solo. 

Solo cross-country flight to a point not less than 300 miles from the 
University of Illinois Airport. During this triangular-course flight, a 
total of three landings will be made. All available radio aids will 
be used. 



45 



STAGE B (NIGHT FLYING) 

Period 9. One hour dual. 

Taxiing, takeoffs, climbs, gliding turns, and landings. 

Period 10. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on takeoffs and landings. Student must stay in traffic 

pattern. 

Period 11. One hour solo. 
Same as period 10. 

Period 12. Three hours dual. 

Night cross-country following a predetermined flight plan over a tri- 
angular course. One leg will be over a lighted airway. 

STAGE C (INSTRUMENT FLYING) 

Period 13. One hour instrument Link and one hour simulated in- 
strument. 
Straight and level flight, climbs, glides, and climbing and gliding turns. 

Period 14. One hour instrument Link and one hour simulated 
instrument. 

Same as period 13, plus turns to headings, unusual attitudes, and pri- 
mary patterns. 

Period 15. One hour instrument Link and one hour simulated 

instrument. 

Review and beam bracketing. 

Period 16. Two hours instrument Link. 
True Fade orientation. 

Period 17. Two hours simulated instrument. 
Radio Range orientation. 

SPECIFIC FLIGHT ROUTES 

Period 1. 1st leg: University of Illinois to Peoria Municipal Airport, 
Peoria, Illinois. 
2nd leg: Peoria to University of Illinois. 

Period 2. 1st leg: University of Illinois to Parks Metropolitan Air- 
port, East St. Louis, Illinois. 

2nd leg: East St. Louis to Hillsboro Airport, Hillsboro, Illi- 
nois. 

3rd leg: Hillsboro to University of Illinois. 

46 



Period 3. 1st leg: University of Illinois to Terre Haute, Indiana, by 
dead reekoning. Student files flight plan at Terre 
Haute by radio. 

2nd leg: Terre Haute to Indianapolis Municipal Airport 
along a civil airway. Land at Indianapolis and 
file a flight plan in writing. 

3rd leg: Indianapolis to Lafayette, Indiana, direct, using 
radio only. Close flight plan at Lafayette by 
radio. 

4th leg: Lafayette to University of Illinois by dead reck- 
oning. 

Period 4. 1st leg: University of Illinois to Capital Airport, Spring- 
field, Illinois. 

2nd leg: Springfield to Leckrone Field, Salem, Illinois. 

3rd leg: Salem to University of Illinois. 

Period 5. Radius of action, 034° T.C., and return. 

Period 6. 1st leg: University of Illinois towards Goshen Range Sta- 
tion, Goshen, Indiana (distance unknown). 

2nd leg: Blank to alternate airport, Crawfordsville Munic- 
ipal Airport, Crawfordsville, Indiana. 

3rd leg: Crawfordsville to University of Illinois. 

Period 7. 1st leg: University of Illinois toward Vandalia Airport, 
Vandalia, Illinois. 

2nd leg: Blank to alternate airport, O'Neal Airport, Vin- 
cennes, Indiana. 

3rd leg: Vincennes to University of Illinois. 

Period 8. To Des Moines, Iowa, 300 miles, making one stop en route 
on return. 

Period 12. Dual night cross-country: 

1st leg: University of Illinois to Lafayette Radio, Lafa- 
yette, Indiana. 

(1) SE leg of Chanute Range (RAN), 15 miles 
out. 

(2) Four miles north of Danville, Illinois, 35 
miles out. 



47 



2nd leg: Lafayette to Chieago Radio, Chieago, Illinois. 



Lights: 



(i) 

(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
(5) 
(6) 
(7) 
(8) 
(9) 
(10) 

(11) 



8 miles 

8 
10 
14 
13 
13 
12 

7 

7 



(Rennselaer Airport) 



(Hammond Airport) 
(two left of course) 



Chicago Municipal Airport 



3rd leg: Chicago to University of Illinois. 

(1) West leg of Harvey Range, 15 miles out. 

(2) Five miles west of Kankakee, 48 miles out. 

(3) NW leg of Chanute Range, 106 miles out. 

(4) SW leg of Chanute Range, 112 miles out. 

(5) University of Illinois, 12 miles south of SW 
leg of Chanute Range. 



4 8 



Appendix G — Aviation 104 Flight Syllabus 

Advanced flight training consists of a total of 44 hours, 14 dual and 
30 hours solo. Two hours of the dual are given in the Beechcraft Bonanza 
for the purpose of instructing in the use of manifold pressure, controllable 
pitch propeller, tricycle landing gear and flaps. The remaining 42 hours 
in trainer-type aircraft are devoted to preparation for the C.A.A. com- 
mercial flight test. 

STAGE A (TRAINER) 

Period 1. One hour dual. 

Check out, takeofTs, climbs, straight and level flight, stalls, slow flight, 

steep turns, forced landings, gliding turns, and landings. 

Period 2. One hour solo. 

Review all primary maneuvers including rectangular course, S-turns 

across a road, elementary 8's, stalls, and landings. 

Period 3. One hour solo. 
Same as period 2. 

Period 4. One hour dual. 

Spins, stalls, slow flight, accidental spins, forced landings using def- 
inite patterns, and dragging area. 

Period 5. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on precision spins, stalls, and spirals with and without 

wind correction. 

Period 6. One hour solo. 
Review period 5. 

Period 7. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on accuracy landings using 90° and 180° side ap- 
proaches. 

Period 8. One hour dual. 

Chandelles, lazy 8's, 720° power turns, forward slips, spirals, and 

forced landings. 

Period 9. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on maneuvers in period 8, except forced landings. 

Period 10. One hour solo. 
Same as period 9. 



49 



Period 11. One hour solo. 
Same as period 10. 

Period 12. One hour dual. 

On-pylon 8's, S-turns over a road, forced landings, power approaches, 

and wheel landings. 

Period 13. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on maneuvers in period 12, except forced landings. 

Period 14. One hour solo. 
Same as period 13. 

Period 15. One hour solo. 
Same as period 14. 

Period 16. One hour dual. 

Accuracy landings, 1080° overhead, 360° overhead, 180° overhead, 

spirals, and slips. 

Period 17. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on all overhead approaches. 

Period 18. One hour solo. 

Solo practices on power approaches, wheel landings, and landings 

from a forward slip. 

Period 19. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on chandelles, lazy 8's, and on-pylon 8's. 

Period 20. One hour dual. 

Check on all maneuvers for precision and accuracy, check chandelles 

and lazy 8's for smoothness. 

Period 21. One hour solo. 

Stalls from unusual attitudes, slow flights, precision and accidental 

spins. 

Period 22. One hour solo. 

Review of 720° power turns, chandelles, lazy 8's, and spirals. 

Period 23. One hour solo. 

Review on-pylon 8's, S-turns over a road, elementary 8's, and land- 
ings from a forward slip. 

Period 24. One hour dual. 

Instructor checks student on all maneuvers in periods 21, 22, and 23 

lot precision and smoothness. 



50 



Period 25. One hour solo. 

Practice maneuvers recommended by instructor. 

Period 26. One hour solo. 

Practice on 180° side accuracy landings. 

Period 27. One hour solo. 

Practice on chandelles, lazy 8's, 720° power turns, and spirals. 

Period 28. One hour dual. 

Instructor checks student on all maneuvers in periods 25, 26, and 27 

for precision and smoothness. 

Period 29. One hour solo. 

Practice on maneuvers recommended by instructor. 

Period 30. One hour solo. 

Practice on crosswind takeoffs and landings. 

Period 31. One hour solo. 

Practice on S-turns, elementary 8's, and on-pylon 8's. 

Period 32. One hour dual. 

Instructor checks student on crosswind technique, power approaches, 

wheel landings, and landings from forward slips. 

Period 33. One hour solo. 

Practice on maneuvers recommended by flight instructor in prepa- 
ration for flight test. 

Period 34. One hour solo. 
Same as period 33. 

Period 35. One hour solo. 
Same as period 33. 

Period 36. One hour solo. 
Same as period 33. 

Period 37. One hour dual. 

Flight check by instructor. On this flight the instructor should give 
the student a complete check on all maneuvers required on the C.A.A. 
flight test for a Commercial Pilot certificate and upon completion of 
the flight should advise the student as to what maneuvers he should 
practice for the flight test. 

Period 38. One hour solo. 

Practice on maneuvers recommended by the instructor. 



51 



Period 39. One hour solo. 
Same as period 38. 

Period 40. One hour solo. 
Same as period 38. 

Period 41. One hour solo. 
Same as period 38. 

Period 42. One hour dual. 

Final flight check. Upon completion of this flight, instructor fills out 

C.A.A. form 342A. 

Period 43. C.A.A. flight test. 

STAGE B (BEECHCRAFT BONANZA) 

Period X. One hour dual. 

Operation of manifold pressure, controllable pitch propeller, retract- 
able gear, and flaps. 

Period XX. One hour dual. 
Same as period X. 

NOTE: Periods X and XX may be given any time during the flight 
training course at the convenience of the instructor and the student; 
however, both should be given as early as possible in the syllabus. 

STAGE C (FLIGHT OPTIONS) 

Five hours dual in one-hour periods in preparation for a retake of the 
C.A.A. flight test in the event the student fails it on the first attempt. 



52 



Appendix H — Aviation 205 Flight Syllabus 

The flight instructor course consists of 26 to 32 hours of flight train- 
ing divided as follows: five hours of dual instruction, five hours of solo, 
and 15 hours of practice flight instruction. The flight instruction practice 
periods are logged as dual time since a C.A.A. rated flight instructor 
serves as the student during all practice flight instruction periods. Pro- 
vision is made for a 15-minute ground period before and after each flight. 
Those students who are unable to complete the C.A.A. flight test for a 
Flight Instructor certificate upon the completion of 25 hours are given an 
additional five hours of dual instruction and retake the flight test. 

Period 1. One hour dual. 

Checkout, preflight procedures, starting engine, engine warm-up, 
engine check, taxiing (using ailerons), function of controls, medium 
turns, gentle turns, precision turns, climbs and glides, climbing and 
gliding turns, coordination exercises, and confidence maneuvers. 

Period 2. One hour solo. 

Practice on maneuvers covered during period 1. 

Period 3. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Instructor acts as student and student serves as instructor on all 

maneuvers presented on period 1. 

Period 4. One hour dual. 

Stalls and slow flight without power, stalls and slow flight with power 
(partial stall, normal stall and complete stalls, power-on and power- 
off stalls — minimum controllable speed in climb followed by stall out 
of climbing turn, effect recovery with minimum loss of altitude, and 
minimum controllable speed in glide, power-ofT stall followed by cross- 
control stall out of gliding turn), precision spins, accidental spins, 
spins from climbing turns, spins from gliding turns, spins from steep 
turns, spins from cross-control turns, spirals, and steep climbing and 
gliding turns. 

Period 5. One hour solo. 

Practice on maneuvers introduced during period 4. 

Period 6. One hour flight instruction. 
Practice maneuvers presented during period 4. 

Period 7. One hour dual. 

S-turns across a road, rectangular courses, medium and steep 8's on a 

crossroad, two-bank 8's around pylons, forward slips, takeoffs, cross- 



53 



wind takeofTs, landings, crosswind landings, and 90° approaches to a 
landing. 

Period 8. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on the maneuvers presented during period 7. 

Period 9. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Student serves as instructor on the maneuvers presented in period 7. 

Period 10. One hour dual. 

180° side approach to a landing, 180° overhead approach to a land- 
ing, 360° approach to a landing, 1080° (spiral) approach to a land- 
ing, controlled slipping turns, and 720° power turns. 

Period 11. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on the maneuvers presented during period 10. 

Period 12. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Student serves as flight instructor on the maneuvers presented during 

period 10. 

Period 13. One hour dual. 

Lazy 8's, chandelles, pylon 8's, power approach and wheel landings, 
dragging strange fields, and downwind landings (ONLY if the wind 
velocity does not exceed 10 miles per hour) . 

Period 14. One hour solo. 

Solo practice on the maneuvers presented during period 13 with the 
exception of dragging strange fields and downwind landings, which 
are NOT to be practiced solo. 

Period 15. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Student serves as instructor on the maneuvers presented during 

period 13. 

Period 16. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Review straight and level flight, medium turns, precision climbing and 

gliding turns, coordination exercises, confidence maneuvers, and all 

stalls. 

Period 17. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Review all stalls and slow flight maneuvers, precision spins, accidental 

spins, spins from steep turns, spirals, and slips. 



54 



Period 18. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Review S-turns across road, rectangular courses, medium and steep 8's 
on a crossroad, two-bank 8's around pylons, forward slips, and 180° 
side approach to a landing. 

Period 19. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Review 180° overhead approach, 360° overhead approach, 1080° 

overhead approach, controlled slipping turns, and 720° power turns. 

Period 20. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Review pylon 8's, chandelles, lazy 8's, and power approach with wheel 

landings. 

Period 21. One hour practice flight instruction. 

Student serves as instructor with rated instructor flying as student. 
Student analyzes and corrects errors made in the following maneuvers: 
medium turns, climbing and gliding turns, forward slips, takeoffs, 
landings, 8's around pylons, and 180° side approach to a landing. 



55 



Appendix I — Aviation 206 Flight Syllabus 

Basic Instrument Flight Techniques is the first course in preparing the 
commercial pilot for a C.A.A. instrument rating. It consists of 10 to 12 
hours of instrument Link training and 20 to 22 hours of dual simulated 
instrument flight. Provision is made for ground discussion periods before 
and after each flight. 

Period 1. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. In- 
troduce pitch control. 

Period 2. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Review pitch control; introduce vertical S and standard rate turns. 

Period 3. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Review vertical S and standard rate turns; introduce vertical S-turns, 
vertical circles. 

Period 4. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Review vertical S-turns., vertical circles; introduce Baker patterns. 

Period 5. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Introduce Charlie patterns and magnetic compass turns. 

Period 6. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review pitch control and vertical S. 

Period 7. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce standard rate turns. 

Period 8. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce vertical S-turns, vertical circles. 

Period 9. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce stalls. 

Period 10. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce steep 720° power turns. 

Period 11. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce timed turns, partial panel. 

Period 12. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce vertical S on partial panel. 

Period 13. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce magnetic compass turns. 



56 



Period 14. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce estimated times to altitude. 

Period 15. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review; introduce unusual attitudes. 

Period 16. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Introduce VOR tracking, radial interception, and procedure turns. 

Period 17. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. VOR exercise. 

Period 18. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
VOR time and distance exercise. 

Period 19. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. VOR time and distance exercise. 

Period 20. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Introduce ADF tracking, track interception, and procedure turns. 

Period 21. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. ADF exercise. 

Period 22. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
ADF time and distance exercise. 

Period 23. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. ADF time and distance exercise. 

Period 24. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Introduce L/MFR beam bracketing and orientation. 

Period 25. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Introduce L/MFR beam bracketing and orientation. 

Period 26. Fifty minutes Link trainer and 10 minutes discussion. 
Introduce VOR holding patterns. 

Period 27. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review VOR holding patterns. 

Period 28. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review ADF holding patterns. 

Period 29. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review all full panel maneuvers. 

Period 30. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 
discussion. Review all partial panel maneuvers. 



57 



Period 31. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 

discussion. Practice. 

Period 32. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 

discussion. Practice. 

Period 33. Fifty minutes simulated instrument flight and 10 minutes 

discussion. Practice. 



58 



Appendix J — Aviation 207 Flight Syllabus 

Advanced Instrument Flight Procedures is the second and final course 
leading to a C.A.A. instrument rating. It consists of 10 to 12 hours of 
instrument Link training and 20 to 25 hours of dual simulated instrument 
flight. Provision is made for ground discussion periods before and after 
each flight. A person with 40 or more hours of simulated instrument 
flight experience may go directly into this course without first having 
taken Avi. 206. 

Period 1. One hour and 15 minutes Link trainer and 30 minutes dis- 
cussion. VOR holding and approach procedures. 

Period 2. One hour and 30 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
30 minutes discussion. VOR holding and approach procedures. 

Period 3. One hour and 15 minutes Link trainer and 30 minutes dis- 
cussion. ADF holding and approach procedures. 

Period 4. One hour and 30 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
30 minutes discussion. ADF holding and approach procedures. 

Period 5. One hour and 15 minutes Link trainer and 30 minutes dis- 
cussion. L/MFR holding and approach procedures. 

Period 6. One hour and 30 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
30 minutes discussion. L/MFR holding and approach procedures. 

Periods 7 and 8. Two hours and 15 minutes Link trainer and 30 
minutes discussion. IFR cross-country to Indianapolis and return with 
ILS or GCA approach. 

Periods 9 and 10. Three hours simulated instrument flight and 30 
minutes discussion. IFR cross-country to Indianapolis and return with 
ILS or GCA approach. 

Periods 11 and 12. Two hours and 15 minutes Link trainer and 30 
minutes discussion. IFR cross-country to St. Louis and return with 
ILS or GCA approach. 

Periods 13 and 14. Three hours simulated instrument flight and 30 
minutes discussion. IFR cross-country to St. Louis and return with 
ILS or GCA approach. 

Periods 15 and 16. Two hours and 15 minutes Link trainer and 30 
minutes discussion. IFR cross-country to Chicago and return with ILS 
or GCA approach. 



59 



Periods 17 and 18. Three hours simulated instrument flight and 30 
minutes discussion. IFR cross-country to Chicago and return with ILS 
or GCA approach. 

Period 19. One hour and 15 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
15 minutes discussion. Review all full panel maneuvers. 

Period 20. One hour and 15 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
15 minutes discussion. Review all partial panel maneuvers. 

Period 21. One hour and 15 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
15 minutes discussion. Practice for the C.A.A. flight check. 

Period 22. One hour and 15 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
15 minutes discussion. Practice for C.A.A. flight check. 

Period 23. One hour and 15 minutes simulated instrument flight and 
15 minutes discussion. Practice for the C.A.A. flight check. 



60 



Appendix K — Aviation 101 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours (each student also receives a 
minimum of 13 hours of ground instruction from his flight instructor) 
I. Theory of flight (3 hours) 

A. Forces acting on airplane in flight 

B. Axis of rotation 

1. Movement about the axis 

2. Controls 

C. Stability 

D. Turning flighty including increase in wing loading and stall- 
ing speed 

E. Elementary weight and balance 
II. Civil Air Regulations (10 hours) 

A. Part 1. Certification, identification, and marking of aircraft 
and related products 

B. Part 3.20. Airplane categories: 3.20 (a) (1), (2), (3) 

C. Part 20. Pilot certificates 

D. Part 43. General operation rules 

E. Part 60. Air traffic rules 

1. Visual Flight Rules operation 

2. Instrument Flight Rules operation 

3. VFR and IFR flight plan operation 

4. Air traffic control practices and procedures 

F. Part 62. Notice and reports of aircraft accidents and missing 
aircraft 

G. Regulations of the administrator. Part 620: Security control 
of air traffic 

III. Meteorology (12 hours) 

A. Basic concepts 

B. Elements of meteorology 

1. Temperature 

2. Pressure, including relationship to altimeters 

3. Moisture 

C. Clouds, including characteristics of each type and their effects 
on flight 

D. General circulation 

E. Fronts and frontal weather 

F. Thunderstorms 

G. Icing 
H. Fog 



61 



I. Reports and forecasts, with emphasis on interpretation 

1. Sequence report 

2. Winds-aloft reports and forecasts 

3. Area forecasts 

4. Terminal forecasts 
J. Weather maps 

K. Flight planning and weather 
L. C.A.A. and weather bureau flight assistance 
M. Weather recognition 
N. Elementary weather forecasting 

O. Practical application of meteorological knowledge to safe 
flying practices 
IV. Navigation (11 hours) 

A. Navigation instruments 

B. Methods 

1. Pilotage. Familiarization and use of sectional chart 

2. Dead reckoning 

a. Use of Weems Plotter (Mark II) 

b. Use of D-4 computer 

c. Wind triangle 

d. Time, speed, and distance 

e. Fuel consumption 

3. Radio 

a. VHF Omnirange stations 

(1) Flying the range 

(2) Plotting fixes 

b. L/MF facilities 

C. Flight plans 

D. Use of published aids 

1. Flight Information Manual 

2. Airman's Guide 

3. Notices to Airmen 

V. Radio communications (3 hours) 

A. Proper use of radio, including voice procedure and 
phraseology 

B. Airport traffic control towers 

C. UNICOM 

D. Air traffic control stations 

E. Emergency procedures and frequency 

VI. General service of aircraft and safety practices (6 hours) 
A. Care of aircraft 

1 . Prefiight inspection procedures 



62 



2. Explanation of preventive maintenance, repair, and re- 
quired inspections 

B. Care of engines 

1. Preflight inspection procedures 

2. Fuel requirements 

3. Proper starting, warm-up, and shutdown procedures 

4. Explanation of preventive maintenance, repair, and re- 
quired inspections 

5. Use of operating manual 

6. Functions, limitations, and characteristic errors of instru- 
ments required under Part 43 of the Civil Air Regulations 

C. Flight safety practices 

1. Operation under conditions of high altitude, extreme 
temperatures, gross weight, and icing 

2. Wing ice, propeller ice, and carburetor ice 

3. Adverse surface conditions (rough, soft, and slippery) 

4. Turbulent air 

a. Mountain and canyon effects 

b. Surface obstruction and thermal effects 

5. Marginal visibility during day and night operations 

6. Radio communications failure 

7. Low fuel supply 

8. Aerodynamic effect of frost or snow on airfoils 

9. Maximum range versus maximum endurance operations 

10. Proper tie-down or securing of aircraft 

1 1 . Emergency assistance and lost procedures 

12. Use of landing lights and flares 

13. Obstructions to flight, such as antennae, poles, and birds 

14. Procedure when operating unfamiliar aircraft 
VII. Final examination (3 hours) 



63 



Appendix L — Aviation 102 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours 
I. Meteorology 

A. Basic concepts 

B. The elements of meteorology 

1. Temperature 

2. Pressure 

3. Moisture. Temperature-dewpoint relationship and precipi- 
tation 

C. Stability 

D. General cloud formations and accompanying weather 

E. Pressure areas 

1. Isobars 

2. Winds aloft 

F. Air masses 

1. Movement 

2. Characteristics 

G. Fronts and characteristic weather 

1. Cold front 

2. Warm front 

3. Occluded front 

4. Fronts aloft 
H. Thunderstorms 

I. Ice and turbulence 
J- Fog 
K. Teletype sequence reports, winds-aloft reports and forecasts, 

and area and terminal forecasts 
L. Weather maps 

1. Interpretation 

2. Analysis 

M. U. S. Weather Bureau facilities 

1. Weather assistance service 

2. C.A.A. flight assistance service 

N. Elementary forecasting of weather conditions 
O. Use of knowledge of meteorology in flying 
II. Aircraft engines 

A. Principles of the internal combustion engine 

B. Performance 

1. Horsepower 

2. Cylinder and manifold pressure 

3. Compression ratio 






64 



4. Fuel-air ratio 

5. Detonation 

C. Design and construction 

D. Fuels and fuel systems 

E. Cooling systems 

F. Lubricating systems 

G. Ignition systems 
H. Propellers 

I. Trouble shooting 

J. Inspections and maintenance 
K. Logbooks and other records 
L. General operating procedures 



65 



Appendix M — Aviation 103 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours 
I. Radio communications 

A. Radiotelephone operator permit 

B. Radiotelephone procedures and techniques 
II. Flight Information Manual 

A. General familiarization 

B. Sections particularly emphasized 

1. Air traffic control procedures 

2. Good operating practice 

3. Weather Bureau and C.A.A. Information Service 

4. Search and rescue 

III. Airman's Guide 

IV. Flight planning 
V. Navigation 

A. Pilotage 

1. Charts 

2. Check point 

B. Dead reckoning 

1. Laying out and measuring a course 

2. True airspeed 

3. Making good a course 

4. Time, speed, distance 

5. Fuel consumption 

6. Finding the wind 

7. Tracking 

8. Radius of action 

9. Alternate airport 

10. Off-course correction 

C. Radio 

1. Ground facilities 

a. Omnidirectional radio range 

b. LF/MF radio Range station 

c. Radio beacon 

d. Radio markers 

2. Airborne equipment 

a. Omnidirectional radio range receiver 

b. Low frequency receivers 

c. Loop antenna — (ADF) 
VI. International Morse Code 



66 



Appendix N — Aviation 104 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours 

I. Aircraft, general service and safety practices. A review of those 
items listed under general service of aircraft and safety practices 
in the Aviation 101 ground syllabus, plus the following. 

A. Theory of flight 

1. Forces acting on aircraft in flight 

2. Characteristics of air as a fluid mass 

3. Stability 

B. Performance characteristics of aircraft 

1. Ground effect 

2. Design 

3. Gust load safety factors 

4. Operating limitations 

C. Care and maintenance of equipment 

1. Pressure, quantity, and rate instruments 

2. Radio and electronic equipment 

3. Flotation devices 

4. Fire extinguishers 

5. Safety belts 

6. Windshields, windows, and canopies 

7. Emergency exits 

8. Parachutes 

II. Review of navigation, meteorology, and Civil Air Regulations, 
including Part 42. A review of the above items in accordance 
with the needs of the student before taking the prescribed "aero- 
nautical knowledge" examination for the Commercial Pilot 
certificate 



67 



Appendix O — Aviation 205 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours 
I. Principles of flight instruction 

A. Steps in teaching students to fly 

B. Common errors in instruction 

C. How students learn 

D. Adapting training to individual students 

E. Keeping students interested 

F. Keeping students fit 

G. Analyzing student progress 

H. Self-analysis of ability as an instructor 
I. Summary of points to remember in flight instruction 
J. Civil Air Regulations 
K. Final examination 
II. Fundamentals and psychology of instructing 



68 



Appendix P — Aviation 206 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours 
I. Theory of instrument flight 

A. Construction and function of basic instruments currently in 
use, including artificial horizon, directional gyroscope, turn 
indicator and ball, sensitive altimeter, airspeed indicator, ver- 
tical-speed indicator, magnetic compass 

B. Partial panel instrument flying; development and current use 
of 1-2-3 method of control and cross-check, pitch control, and 
theory of turn and bank 

C. Pitch, power, and bank method of instrument flight control; 
wartime enlightenment and development of artificial horizon 

D. Contact-instrument comparison method of instrument flight; 
attitude instrument flight 

E. Basic instrument flight maneuvers; stalls, steep turns, timed 
turns, magnetic compass turns, speed control, vertical S, 
vertical S-turn, vertical circle, A, B, C, and O patterns, in- 
strument takeoff, and time and distance 

II. Civil Air Regulations 

A. Part 20. Pilot certificates. Instrument rating requirements 

B. Part 43. General operating rules 

1. Aircraft instrument requirements 

2. Pilot proficiency and recent experience requirements 

3. Instrument flight rules 

C. Part 60. Air traffic rules. Enroute IFR rules 

III. Navigation 

A. Review of basic dead-reckoning navigation. Computer review 
and practice 

B. Introduction to radio navigation 

1. Plotting radio fixes 

a. Visual-omni range bearings 

b. ADF relative bearings 

c. DME and VOR-TAC 

2. Estimating arrival times 

3. Preflight navigation log 

IV. Meteorology 

A. Review of reading and interpretation of sequence reports, 
terminal and area forecasts, winds-aloft reports, winds-aloft 
analyses, storm detection radar reports, and severe weather 
warnings 

B. Review of essential elements of weather, including general 
circulation, air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, fog, icing, turbu- 
lence, and other hazards to flight 

69 



Appendix Q — Aviation 207 Ground Syllabus 

Ground training — 48 classroom hours 

I. Instrument flight publications and references 

A. U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, Jeppesen, and military 
approach plates, RF charts, terminal area charts, and route 
charts 

B. Flight Information Manual and Airman's Guide 

C. C.A.A. Airways Operations Training Series 

D. Criteria for Standard Instrument Approaches 

E. ANC Procedures for the Control of Air Traffic 

F. Air Force Manuals 51-37, 51-38, 51-40 
II. C.A.A. air traffic control system 

A. Organization and responsibility 

B. Approach control 

C. Air route traffic control centers 

D. Airport control towers 

E. Air traffic communications stations 

F. Communications system: Services A, C, and F of the C.A.A. 

III. Meteorology 

A. Advanced meteorological theory. Evolution or history of fore- 
casting through current theory 

B. Tools of the meteorologist. Wet bulb thermometer, barometer, 
theodolite, radiosone, ceilometer, etc. 

C. Weather dissemination system of the U. S. Weather Bureau 
and Circular N 

D. World-wide weather affecting aviation 

IV. Preparation for C.A.A. written examination 

A. Review of Civil Air Regulations 

1. Part 610. Minimum enroute altitudes and selection criteria 

2. Part 620. Security regulations 

3. Review of Parts 43 and 60 

B. Navigation review 

1. IFR cross-country problems 

2. Advanced radio navigation techniques 

3. Dual installations, MDF, Loran, etc. 

C. IFR weather problems 

1. Evaluation of daily weather map 

2. Analysis of teletype information 

3. Correcting the forecast 



70 



References 

The publications listed below are basic sources of materials included 
in the C.A.A. written examinations for Private Pilot, Commercial Pilot, 
and Flight Instructor certificates and the instrument rating. These bul- 
letins, manuals, and references are subject to revision at any time, and 
care should be taken to ensure use of current publications. These ma- 
terials may be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. 
Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. 

In addition to the listed references, many excellent articles, books, 
bulletins, manuals, films, and filmstrips are published by the flying 
branches of the U. S. Department of Defense, various manufacturers, and 
professional experts. 

Civil Air Regulations 

Part 1. Certification, Identification, and Marking of 

Aircraft and Related Products $ .05 

Part 20. Pilot Certificates 05 

Part 43. General Operation Rules 05 

Part 60. Air Traffic Rules 10 

Part 62. Notices and Reports of Aircraft Accidents and 

Missing Aircraft 05 

Aircraft Powerplant Handbook (C.A.A. Technical 

Manual No. 107) 1.50 

Airman's Guide (individual copies vary in price; subscription of 26 
issues per year, including Flight Information Manual) 2.25 

Airways Operations Training Series 

Bulletin No. 1. Instrument Landing System 20 

Bulletin No. 2. Location Markers and Homing Facilities 15 

Bulletin No. 3. Visual-Aural Ranges and Omniranges 20 

Bulletin No. 4. Distance Measuring Equipment and 

Offset Course Computer 15 

Facts of Flight 50 

Flight Instruction Manual (C.A.A. Technical Manual No. 100) .. . 1.50 

Flight Instructor Oral Examination Guide Book 05 

Meteorology for Pilots (C.A.A. Bulletin No. 25) 1.50 

Path of Flight 65 

Personal Aircraft Inspection Manual (C.A.A. Technical 

Manual No. 101 ) 75 

Questions and Answers for Private Pilots 25 

Realm of Flight 75 

Terrain Flying (C.A.A. Office of Aviation Information) 30 

71 



THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS HAS CATALOGED THIS PUBLICATION AS FOLLOWS: 

Bryan, Leslie Aulls. 

Flight and preflight curricula. [Urbana, 1958] 

71 p. illus. 23 cm. (University of Illinois. Institute of Aviation. Aeronautics bulletin 
no. 21). 

University of Illinois bulletin, v. 56, no. 15. 
Bibliography: p. 71. 

1. Flight training — Curricula, i. Title. (Series: Illinois. University. Institute of Avia- 
tion. Aeronautics bulletin no. 21) 

TL507.I4 no. 21 *629.126 629.13252 A 58-9954 

Illinois. Univ. Library for Library of Congress f 



THE INSTITUTE OF AVIATION, established in 1945 as the Institute of 
Aeronautics, is operated as the administrative agency responsible for the 
fostering and correlation of the educational and research activities related 
to aviation in all parts of the University of Illinois. Other functions 
include academic instruction, flight training, management of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois Airport, and aeronautical research. 

In connection with the latter function, the Institute issues two types of 
publications: first, a group of reports on research results, and second, a 
series of bulletins on aviation subjects of an extension-service nature to 
the citizens of the state. 

The following publications are presently in print: 



BULLETIN TWO: 
BULLETIN FIVE: 

BULLETIN SIX: 

BULLETIN SEVEN: 

BULLETIN FOURTEEN: 

BULLETIN FIFTEEN: 
BULLETIN SIXTEEN: 

BULLETIN EIGHTEEN: 

BULLETIN NINETEEN: 
BULLETIN TWENTY: 
BULLETIN TWENTY-ONE: 



Landscape Planting for Airports, Florence B. 
Robinson, 1948. 

Evaluation of the School Link as an Aid in Primary 
Flight Instruction, A. C. Williams, Jr., and Ralph 
E. Flexman, 1949. 

Lightplane Tires on Turf and Concrete, Leslie A. 
Bryan, 1949. 

Light Aircraft Operating Costs, Leslie A. Bryan, 
1949. 

Developing an Aircraft Maintenance Curriculum, 
Leslie A. Bryan, 1955. 

Airport Shop Operations, Leslie A. Bryan, 1955. 

College and University Airport Management, 
Leslie A. Bryan, 1955. 

Simultaneous Contact-instrument Flight Training, 
Alexander C. Williams, Jr., Robert C. Houston, 
Lowell E. Wilkerson, 1955. 

Flight Experience Course for Teachers and 
Businessmen, Leslie A. Bryan, 1956. 

When Classroom Teachers Learn to Fly, 
Harold C. Hand, 1958. 

Flight and Preflight Curricula, 
Leslie A. Bryan, 1958. 



Publications of the Institute of Aviation will be sent free of charge 
upon request.